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XII.-REPORT OF FISH-COMMISSIONERS..

.410-417

XIII.-PRACTICAL PAPERS ...

418

CURRENCY. By Hon. Wendell Phillips..

418

The world afloat on the sea of experiment..

418

Repeated experiments have led to progress.

419

What was impossible in 1700 is easily done in 1850.

419

The people to be trusted in currency matters..

420

Place where, and time when, to decide the success of most of man's

efforts—Finance plan-three things to be secured.

421

England could not hold to a specie basis ....

422

Fine illustrations of a specie basis- Important financial plans...422-426

Business men of the nation to hold the currency helm

425

Our nation needs double the currency of older and richer nations. 427

Amount of currency of 1870 too small for 1876..

428

Our note-currency little to do with prices....

.429,430
In developing our new country we work at a disadvantage by high
rates of interestWe never really had a gold base. .

.431, 432
A debtor nation always a slave of his creditor...

432

General business cannot be profitable with money at high rates of

interest...

433

DRESS. By John Bascom, LL. D.

434

Let us trust that truth will drive us into obedience.

434

Food, shelter, and dress the primitive necessities

435

Claims on the market of one little argosy of fashion.

436

No absurdities can plead more antiquity than those of dress

437

Foolish ordinance of society accepted as if it were a decree of

heaven—The Chinese foot the typical fact of fashion.........438, 439

Women have been slower than men to accept the sober laws of

taste-A martyr to philosophy.. :

440, 441

Rings, bracelets, &c., remnants of barbarism.

442

Fashion takes to itself a model from the camel and dromedary. 443

Society dependent on the tricks and artifices of dress..

444

The precept of the apostle—a sound basis

445

Simplicity and individuality pleasing in dress.

446

Beauty will remain from century to century.

447

A perfect love of a thing.

448

Society is a system of delicate dependencies and reciprocal respon-

sibilities...

449

Dress is to social influence what language is to national intercourse 451

A FARER'S ORCHARD. By J. C. Plumb.

.452-463

Present condition.

453

Remedies—Mulch for drouth

454

Winter, spring, and root killing.

455

Winter-mulch-Insects and vermin,

456

Enrourage the Entomologist ....

457

Natures' helps-Poisons, canker-worm, codling-moth.. 458, 459

Injury from furm-stock-Effect of pasturing.

460

Too rich soils–Orchard site and culture...

461, 462

Why not have a complete orchard.

463

THE PROPER ADVANCEMENT OF WOMAN. By Mrs. Fannie B. Den-

nett.....

463, 468

The ballot may or may not be a help to woman..

463

Her hands too full already..

464

More time to read, rest, and think needed.

464

Much time consumed in useless fancy-work..

465

Intelligence—Strong moral principles and quiet home-influence

great powers in moulding society....

466

The Grange offers encouragement to farmers' wives.

467

Let woman ask for more time to cultivate the higher and nobler

attributes of her nature.

468

-452, 453

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CONSTITUTION.

ARTICLE I.

OF THE NAME AND OBJECT OF THE SOCIETY.

This society shall be known as the “Wisconsin State Agricultural Society.” Its object shall be to promote the advancement of agriculture, horticulture, and the mechanical and household arts.

ARTICLE II.

OF THE MEMBERS.

The society shall consist of life-members, who shall pay on subscribing, twenty dollars, and of honorary and corresponding members, who shall be elected by a twothirds vote of the members of the executive board, at any regular meeting. The presidents of county agricultural societies shall be members ex-officio, entitled to the same privileges as life-members, and, together shall be known as the general committee of the society.

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ARTICLE III.

OF THE OFFICERS.

The officers of the society shall consist of a president, one vice-president for each congressional district of the state, a secretary, a treasurer, and seven additional members, who shall hold their respective offices for the term of one year from the first day of January next succeeding the date of their election, and until their successors shall have been elected; and all of whom, together with the ex-president latest in office, and the president and general secretary of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, shall constitute the executive board.

ARTICLE IV.

OF THE POWERS AND DUTIES OF OFFICERS.

The presidents and vice-presidents shall perform such duties as are common to such officers in like associations, as may be required by the executive board.

The secretary shall keep the minutes of all meetings, and have immediate charge of the books, papers, library, and collections, and other property of the society. He shall also attend to its correspondence, and prepare and superintend the publication of the annual report of the society, required by law.

The treasurer shall keep the funds of the society and disburse the same on the order of the president, or a vice-president, countersigned by the secretary, and shall make report of all receipts and expenditures at the regular meeting of the society in December.

The executive board shall have power to make suitable by-laws to govern the aotion of the several members thereof. They shall have general charge of all the property and interests of the society, and make such arrangements for the holding and management of general and special exhibitions as the welfare of the society and the interests of industry shall seem to require.

The general committee shall be charged with the interests of the society in the several counties where they respectively reside, and constitute a medium of communication between the executive board and the public at large.

ARTICLE V.

OF MEETINGS AND ELECTIONS.

The annual meeting of the society for the transaction of general business shall be held in its rooms in Madison, on the first Wednesday in December, at three o'clock P. M. in each year, and ten days' notice thereof shall be given by the secretary, in one or more papers printed in the city of Madison.

The election of officers of the society shall be held each year during and at the general exhibition, and the exact time and place of the election shall be notified by the secretary in the official list of premiums and in all the general programmes of the exhibition.

Special meetings of the society will be called by order of the executive board, on giving twenty days' notice in at least three newspapers of general circulation in the state, of the time, place, and object of such meeting.

At any and all meetings of the society, ten members shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business, though a less number may adjourn from time to time.

ARTICLE VI.

OF AMENDMENTS.

This constitution may be amended by a vote of two-thirds of the members attend. ing any annual meeting; all amendments having been first submitted in writing at the previous annual meeting, recorded in the minutes of the proceedings, and read by the secretary in the next succeeding meeting for the election of officers.

BY-LAWS.

SECTION I.

OF OFFICERS.

The officers of the society shall, ex-officio, fill the corresponding offices in the Executive Committee.

SECTION II.

OF THE DUTIES AND POWERS OF OFFICERS.

The duties of the President, in addition to those defined by the Constitution, and the By-Laws regulating the duties of the permanent committees, shall be as follows, to-wit:

1. To inspect the fair-grounds, after they shall have been prepared for the annual exhibition by the special committee of arrangements appointed for that purpose, and suggest such mo'lifications or further preparations as he may deem necessary.

2. To formally open the annual fair of the society, at such time as the executive committee may prescribe, with an appropriate address.

3. As the executive head of the society, to have a general supervision and control of the entire exhibition, subject only to the authority of the executive committee.

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The duties of the Secretary, more specifically defined than in the Constitution, shall be as follows:

1. To make a faithful record of each meeting of the executive committee, and keep such record in a condition for the convenient reference of any member thereof, at any time; also to make a record of every order drawn on the treasurer, and delivered to parties in whose favor they were so drawn—separately entering and numbering the orders drawn to pay premiums and those to pay general expenses, and so defining them—and of all moneys due the society; in all cases holding the parties so indebted responsible therefor until they shall have presented him a certificate from the treasurer, showing that the same has been paid.

2. To open and carry on such correspondence as may be advantageous to the society or to the common cause of agricultural improvement, not only with individual agriculturists and eminent practical and scientific men of other industrial

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