The official illustrated guide to the South-eastern railway and its branches

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Published under the authority of the directors, by W. H. Smith and Son, 186, Strand; Arthur Hall Virtue, and Company, Paternoster-Row; G. Lindridge, Hastings, 1858 - 434 páginas

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Página 304 - tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles : Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon...
Página 1 - A mighty mass of brick, and smoke, and shipping, Dirty and dusky, but as wide as eye Could reach, with here and there a sail just skipping In sight, then lost amidst the forestry Of masts; a wilderness of steeples peeping On tiptoe through their sea-coal canopy; A huge, dun cupola, like a foolscap crown On a fool's head - and there is London Town!
Página 145 - This spirit shall return to Him Who gave its heavenly spark ; Yet think not, sun, it shall be dim When thou thyself art dark ! No! it shall live again, and shine In bliss unknown to beams of thine, By Him recalled to breath, Who captive led captivity, Who robbed the grave of victory, And took the sting from death!
Página 43 - It was not in the battle; No tempest gave the shock ; She sprang no fatal leak, She ran upon no rock. His sword was in its sheath, His fingers held the pen, When Kempenfelt went down With twice four hundred men.
Página 2 - This Tower is a citadel to defend or command the city; a royal palace for assemblies or treaties; a prison of state for the most dangerous offenders; the only place of coinage for all England at this time; the armoury for warlike provision; the treasury of the ornaments and jewels of the crown; and general conserver of the most records of the king's courts of justice at Westminster.
Página 205 - Long trills and gushing ecstacies of song, For these wild headlands and the sea-mew's clang. With thee beneath my windows, pleasant sea ! I long not to o'erlook earth's fairest glades And green savannahs : Earth has not a plain So boundless or so beautiful as thine.
Página 19 - EARTH has not anything to show more fair : Dull would he be of soul who could pass by A sight so touching in its majesty : The city now doth like a garment wear The beauty of the morning ; silent, bare, Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie Open unto the fields and to the sky, ' All bright and glittering in the smokeless air. Never did sun more beautifully steep...
Página 12 - No towers along the steep; Her march is o'er the mountain waves, Her home is on the deep. With thunders from her native oak, She quells the floods below, — As they roar on the shore, When the stormy winds do blow ; When the battle rages loud and long, And the stormy winds do blow.
Página 19 - EARTH has not anything to show more fair: Dull would he be of soul who could pass by A sight so touching in its majesty: This City now doth, like a garment, wear The beauty of the morning; silent, bare, Ships, towers, domes, theatres and temples lie Open unto the fields, and to the sky; All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.

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