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the likeness of sinful flesh, at once to condemn sin, and to save his people from its tremendous effects. Here is salvation, therefore, for fallen man. Do you believe, my brethren, that this salvation is necessary? I know that you believe it. It is a salvation of which you all stand in need; and therefore I earnestly recommend it to your attention and your acceptance. It is freely offered to every penitent and believing sinner. You are invited, you are commanded, to accept this salvation. And what is its nature and character? It is a salvation that remedies all the disorders of the fall. Jesus Christ, the second Adam, became incarnate, and "died, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us unto God;" and thus he "made peace by the blood of his cross." Sin is atoned for—God's justice is reconciled—and a new and living way is opened, whereby the Most High is discovered to be the believer's Father and God. This is a salvation which delivers from sin and all its painful effects—from its punishment, its guilt, its power—and, at length, from its existence. It sanctifies the depraved heart. It leads again to the love of God. It comforts and supports man in his passage through a world of sin and woe. It renders affliction comparatively light; and makes death the christian's friend. It takes the redeemed and sanctified soul to heaven; it raises the body from the grave, and glorifies both soul and body in the image of God, and the likeness of Jesus Christ, the Saviour and Redeemer. All this, and more than this, is implied in the salvation of the glorious gospel of the grace of God.

My dear brethren, which do you choose — which do you desire—which do you pursue—the happiness of belonging to Jesus Christ, or the misery of living and dying in sin? Will you have life or death? One or the other of these must be the object of your election; as there is no neutral ground on which you can stand. Are any of you careless and indifferent, in reference to these important truths? What! indifferent whether you are going to heaven or hell?— whether you shall be everlastingly happy, or eternally miserable? Alas! how shall you escape—how can you escape—if you neglect so great salvation! But happy are all those, who, convinced of these important truths, embrace that glorious deliverance which is exhibited to us in the word of God, and offered to us in Jesus Christ. "He that believeth on the Son hath everlasting life; and he that believeth not the Son shall not see life, but the wrath of God abideth on him."

SERMON II.

JUSTIFICATION BY FAITH.

Galatians ii. 15, 16.

WE WHO ARE JEWS BY NATURE, AND NOT SINNERS OF THE GENTILES, KNOWING THAT A MAN IS NOT JUSTIFIED BY THE WORKS OF THE LAW, BUT BY THE FAITH OF JESUS CHRIST, EVEN WE HAVE BELIEVED IN JESUS CHRIST, THAT WE MIGHT BE JUSTIFIED BY THE FAITH OF CHRIST, AND NOT BY THE WORKS OF THE LAW: FOR BY THE WORKS OF THE LAW SHALL NO FLESH BE JUSTIFIED.

"it is appointed unto men once to die." But the period of the event is uncertain. With respect to ourselves, considered individually, it may be near; but under any circumstances it cannot be far distant; for life at the longest is confined within narrow limits. Unless the arbiter of life and death deal with us in a manner different from other men, in less than thirty years the majority of this congregation will have gone to their long home ; and within the space of seventy or eighty, in all human probability, every man, woman, and child within these walls, will be numbered amongst the millions of the dead. There is no discharge in this war. It is absolutely certain that at no distant period we must meet death. But in what character? Either as the king of terrors; or as a conquered enemy, and the messenger of peace and joy. "And after death the judgment; for we must all appear before the judgment-seat of Christ, that every one may receive the things done in his body, according to that he hath done, whether it be good or bad." All the generations that ever lived upon the earth will be summoned before that tribunal. There, my brethren, you and I must stand. There we must be tried, and numbered among one of the two classes, into which the Almighty and omniscient Judge will separate all the children of Adam one from another, "as a shepherd divideth his sheep from the goats." There we must be found either among the righteous at the right hand, to whom the Judge will say, " Come ye blessed of my father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world:" or otherwise, among the wicked at the left hand, on whom he will denounce the tremendous sentence, "Depart from me, ye cursed, into everlasting fire prepared for the devil and his angels." Under this solemn conviction, let me appeal to your consciences, brethren, whether it be not a matter of infinite importance that we should know how we are to obtain confidence in the prospect of that great and awful day. And blessed be God, we are not left in uncertainty upon this infinitely momentous concern. For though in consequence of original and actual sin, we are in a state of condemnation, the scripture has pointed out a way in which we may be justified, accepted, acquitted, and made partakers of eternal life and glory.

But, alas! men in general are not disposed to find out this way, or to make any serious inquiries concerning it. And what is the reason? Our Lord gives an answer to this question: '' they that are whole need not a physician, but they that are sick." None will value a remedy until they know they are diseased. To apply this to men in the character of sinners, it may be remarked, that they must be acquainted with their condemnation and misery by sin, before they will welcome deliverance and salvation by Christ. The doctrine of man's condemnation, in consequence of original sin and actual transgression, is inculcated throughout the scriptures. This is the foundation on which the gospel stands. And the gospel is a dispensation which brings glad tidings of mercy to the miserable, of forgiveness to the guilty, of redemption to the captive, of justification and salvation to the ruined and lost. But it is one of the devices of Satan, the enemy of God and man, to corrupt the gospel; and this he has effected in a greater or less degree in all ages. In the churches of Galatia there were false teachers, under his influence, who distorted the doctrine of justification by Christ; and thus they perverted the whole gospel, and introduced, in the words of the apostle at the commencement of this epistle,—"another gospel." His principal objects therefore, in writing to the Galatians, were to oppose these false teachers, to confute their error, and to establish the great and leading truths of the

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