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Enter SebastiAN. Seb. I am sorry, madan, I have hurt your kinsman ; But had it been the brother of my blood, I must have done no less, with wit and safety. You throw a strange regard upon me, and By that I do perceive it hath offended you; Pardon ine, sweet one, even for the vows We made each other but so late ago. Duke., one face, one voice, one habit, and two persons; A natural perspective, that is, and is not. Seb. Antonio, O my dear Antonio ! How have the hours rack'd and tortur'd Ine, Since I have lost thee. 4 ot. Sebastian are you ? Seb. Fear'st thou that, Antonio 1 Ant. How have you made division of yourself?— An apple, cleft in two, is not more twin Than these two creatures. Which is Sebastian 7 Oli. Most wonderful : &cb. Do I stand there 1 I never had a bro. ther: Nor can there be that deity in my nature, Qs here and every where. I had a sister, Whom the blind waves and surges have devour'd :of charity,” what kin are you to me? [To Viola. What countryman f what name t what parentage 1 Vio. Of Messaline: Sebastian was my father; Such a Sebastian was my brother too, So went he suited to his watery tomb : ls spirits can assume both form and suit You coune to fright us. *e”. A spirit I am, indeed ; But an in that dimension grossly clad, which from the womb I did participate. Were you a woman, as the rest goes even, I should my tears let fall upon your cheek, And say, -Thrice welcoine, drowned viola : Kio. My father had a mole upon his brow. &eb. And so had mine. Vio. And died that day when Viola from her birth Had number'd thirteen years. Seb. 9 that record is lively in my soul He finished, indeed, his mortal act, That day that made my sister thirteen years. *io. If notbing lets to make us happy both, But this my masculine usurp'd attire, Do not embrace me, till each circumstance of place, tine, fortune, do cohere and jump, That I am Viola : which to confirm, I'll bring you to a captain in this town, woere lie , my maiden weeds; by whose gentle help I was preserv'd, to serve this noble count: A 11 the occurrence of my fortune since Hath been between this lady, and this lord. ** b. So comes it, lady, you have been mistook : [To Olivia. But nature to her hias drew in that. You would have been contracted to a maid : Nor are you therein, by my line deceiv'd, You are betroth'd both to a maid and man. Duke. Be not aunaz'd; right noble is his blood.— is this be so, as yet the glass seems true, I “hall have share in this most happy wreck: Boy, thou hast said to ine a thousand times, [To Viola. Thou never should'st love woman like to ine.

* Out of charity tell me. * Ilinders.

Vio. And all will I over swear; And, all those swearings keep as true in soul, As doth that orbed continent the file That severs day from night. Duke. Give me thy hand; And let me see thee in thy woman's weeds. Vio. The captain, that did bring me first on shore, Hath my maid’s garments : he, upon some action, Is now in durance ; at Malvolio's suit, A gentleman aud follower of my lady's. 04i. He shall eularge him :-Fetch Malvolio hither :— And yet, alas, now I remember me,

They say, poor gentleman, he's much distract.

those sayings

Re-enter Clown, with a !etter.

A most extracting frenzy of mine own From my remembrance clearly banish'd his.— How does he, sirrah Co. Truly, madam, he holds Belzebub at the stave's end, as well as a man in his case may do : he has here writ a letter to you, I should have given it you to-day morning; but as a inadman’s epistles are no gospels, so it skills not much, when they are delivered. Oli. Open it, and read it. Clo. Look then to be well edified, when the fool delivers the madman :-By the lord, madam.— Oti. How now ! art thou mad : Clo: No, madam, I do but read madness: an your ladyship will have it as it ought to be you must allow vor. * Qli. Pr’ythee, read i'thy right wits. Clo. So I do, madonna; but to read his right wits, is to read thus: therefore perpend, my princess, and give ear. Oli. Read it, you sirrah. [To FA B1 AN. Fab. (Reads.) By the Lord, madam, wou *rong me, and the world shatt know it . though you have put me into dar press, an at given your drunken cousin rule over me, yet have I the benefit of my senses as trett "as your ladyship I have your own tetter that induced one to the semblance I put on . . it, the which I doubt not but to do myself much right, or you much shame. Think of me as wou please. I leave my duty a little unthought of, and speak out of my injury. The madly-us'd MAlvolio. Oli. Did he write this 1 Clo. Ay, madan. 1211&e. This savours not much of distraction. Oli. See him deliver'd, Fabian ; bring him hither. [For it Fabia N. My lord, so please you, these things further thought on, To think me as well a sister as a wife, One day shall crown the alliance on’t, so please you, Here at my house, and at my proper cost. Duke. Madam, I am most apt to einbrace your offer.— Your master quits you : (To viola.] and, for your service done him, So much against the mettle ; of your sex, So far beneath your soft and tender breeding, And since you call'd me master for so long, Here is my hand ; you shall from this time be Your master's unistress. Oli. A sister you are she.

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letter; You must not now deny it is your hand, Write from it if you can, in hand, or phrase ; Or say, 'tis not your seal, nor your invention : You can say none of this: Well grant it then, And tell me in the modesty of honour,

| Clo. Why, some are born great, some arbiere

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Why you have given me such clear lights of, in his revenges.

favour : Bade me come smiling, and cross-garter'd to you, To put on yellow stockings, and to frown Upon Sir Toby, and the lighter " people : And, acting this in an obedient hope, why have you suffered me to be imprison'd, Kept in a dark house, visited by the priest, And made the most notorious geck, t and gull, That e'er invention play'd on ? tell me why. Oli. Alas ! Malvolio, this is not my writing, Though I confess, much like the character : But, out of question, 'tis Maria's hand. And now I do bethink ine, it was she First told me thou wast mad; then cam'st in smiling, And in such forins which here were presuppos'd Upon thee in the letter. Pr’ythee, be content: This practice hath most shrewdly pass'd upon thee; But, when we know the grounds and authors of it, Thou shalt be both the plaintiff and the judge Of thine own cause. Fab. Good maslam, hear me speak ; And let uo quarrel, nor no brawl to come, Taint the condition of this present hour. Which I have wonder'd at. In hope it shall not, Most freely I confess, myself and Toby Set this device against Malvolio here, Upon some stubborn and uncourteous parts We had conceiv'd against him : Maria writ The letter, at Sir Toby's great importance ; t In recompense whereof, he hath married her. How with a sportful malice it was follow'd, May rather pluck on laughter than revenge; If that the injuries be justly weigh'd, That have on both sides past. Oli. Alas, poor fool! how have they baffled ; thee .

• Inferior. 1 fool. t Importunacy. $ Cheated.

i Mal. I'll be revenged on the whole pack of you. Frit. Oli. He hath been most notoriously abus d. Duke. Pursue him, and entreat laita to a peace:— | He hath not told us of the captain yet: When that is known, and golden time convents," A solemn combination shall be made Of our dear souls–Mean time, sweet sister, We will not part from hence.—Cesario, come; For so you shall be while you are a man; But, when in other habits you are seen, Orsino's mistress, aud uis fancy's queen* Erewat. Song.

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Tire fable of this play, (written in 1598,) is taken from a novel of which Boccace is the original author; but it is more than probable that our poet read it in a book called The Palace of Pleasure; a collection of novels translated from different authors, by one William Painter, 1566, 4to. Shakspeare has only borrowed from the novel a few leading circumstances in the graver parts of the drama: the comic characters are entirely of his owo sormation: one of them, Parolles, a boaster and a coward, is the sheet-anchor of the piece. The plot is not sufficiently probable. Some of the scenes are forcibly written, whilst others are impoverished and uninteresting. The moral of the play may be correctly ascertained from Dr. Johnson's estimate of the character of Bertram : “I cannot reconcile my heart to Bertram ; a man noble without generosity, and young without truth; who marries Helena as a coward, and leaves her as a profligate: when she is dead, by his unkindness, *eaks home to a second marriage, is accused by a woman whom he has wronged, defends himself by falsehoou,

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Count. In delivering my son from me, I bury a second husband. Ber. And I, in going, madanj, weep o'er my fatuer’s death anew : but I must attend his majesty’s connmand, to whom I am now in ward, * evermore in subjection. 1. of. You shall find of the king a husband, rhadarn :-you, Sir, a father : He that so generally ** at all times good, must of necessity hold his virtue to you ; whose worthiness would stir it up where it wanted, rather than lack it where there is such abundance. (ow rat. What hope is there of his majesty's armeudtnerit or flaf. He hath abandoned his physicians, ma**on , under whose practices he hath persecuted turne with hope; and finds no other advantage ** the process but only the losing of hope by tarne. * ****. This young gentlewoman had a father, 'ou that had of how sad a passage 'tis () whose

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skill was almost as great as his honesty; had it stretched so far, it would have inade nature inmortal, and death should have play for lack of work. ‘Would, for the king's sake, he were living ! I think, it would be the death of the king's disease. Las. How called you the man you speak of, madann f Count. He was famous, Sir, in his profession, and it was his great right to be so : Gerard de Narbon. Las. He was excellent, indeed, madam ; the king very lately spoke of him adminingly, and mourningly : he was skilful enough to have lived still, if knowledge could be set up against Inortality. Ber. what is it, my good lord, the king languishes off Laf. A fistula, my lord. Ber. I heard not of it before. Laf. I would, it were not notorious.--was this gentlewoman the daughter of Gerard de Narbon f Count. His sole child, my lord : and bequeathed to my overlooking. I have those hopes of her good, that her education promises : her dispositions she inherits, which makes fair gifts fairer: for where an unclean mind carries virtuous qualities, " there commendations go with pity, they are virtues and traitors too; in

* Qualities of good breeding aud eruditiew.

Oli. Have 1, Malvolio 1 no. | f Mal. Lady you have. Pray you, peruse that gre letter; upo You must not now deny it is your hand, one Write from it if you can, in hand, or phrase: the Or say, 'tis not your seal, nor your invention: rem You can say none of this: well grant it then, bar.

And tell me in the modesty of honour, & ago.
Why you have given me such clear lights of in h
favour : M
Bade me come smiling, and cross-garter'd to you.
you, 0.
to put on yellow stockings, and to frown D
Upon Sir Toby, and the lighter" people:
And, acting this in an obedient hope, ! he t
Why have you suffered me to be imprison'd, whe
Kept in a dark house, visited by the priest, |A so
And made the most notorious geck, and gull, of ol
That e'er invention play'd on 1 tell me why. We
Oli. Alas ! Malvolio, this is not my writing, For
Though I confess, much like the character: But,
But, out of question, 'tis Maria's hand. Orsil

And now I do bethink me, it was she
First told me thou wast mad; then cam'st in
smiling,
And in such forms which here were presuppos'd, Clo.
Upon thee in the letter. Pr’ythee, be content:

This practice hath most shrewdly pass'd upon thee;

But, when we know the grounds and authors of it,

Thou shalt be both the plaintiff and the judge |

Of thine own cause.
Fab. Good matlam, hear me speak;
And let no quarrel, nor no brawl to come,
Taint the condition of this present hour.
Which I have wonder'd at. In hope it shall not,
Most freely I confess, myself and Toby
Set this device against Malvolio here,
Upon some stubborn and uncourteous parts
We had conceiv'd against him : Maria writ
The letter, at Sir Toby's great importance; t
In recompense whereof, he hath married her.
How with a sportful malice it was follow'd,
May rather pluck on laughter than revenge ;
If that the injuries be justly weigh'd,
That have on both sides past.
Oli. Alas, poor fool! how have they battled $
thee
* Infurior. Fool. i importunacy. $ cheated.

Het. That I wish well.—"Tis pity—

Par. What's pity ?

Het. That wishing well had not a body in't, which might be felt : that we, the poorer born, Whose baser stars do shut us up in wishes, Might with effects of then follow our friends, And show what we alone must think; * which Returus us thanks. [never

Enter a PAGE.

Page. Monsieur Parolles, my lord calls for you. [E., it PAGE. Par. Little Helen, farewell : if I can reinember thee, I will think of thee at court. Hel. Monsieur Parolles, you were born under a charitable star. Par. Under Mars, i. Piet. I especially think, under Mars. Par. Why under Mars? Het. The wars have so kept you under, that you must needs be born under Mars. Par. When he was predominant. Pfei. When he was retrograde, I think, rather. Parr. Why think you so Het. You go so much backward, when you fight. Par. That’s for advantage. Firt. So is running away, when fear proposes the safety : But the composition, that your valour and fear makes in you, is a virtue of a good wing, and I like the wear well. Par. I am so full of businesses, I cannot answer thee acutely : I will return perfect courtier ; in the which, my instruction shall serve to naturalize thee, so thou wilt be capable + of a courtier's counsel, and understand what advice shall thrust upon thee; else thou diest in thine untuankfulness, and thine ignorance makes thee away : farewell. When thou hast leisure, say thy prayers; when thou hast none, remember thy friends: get thee a good husband, and use him as he uses thee : so farewell. [Euit. Het. Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie, which we ascribe to heaven: the fated sky Gives us free scope ; only, doth backward pull our slow designs, when we ourselves are dull. what power is it, which mounts my love so high ; That makes me see, and cannot feed mine eye the mightiest space in fortune nature brings To join like likes, and kiss like native things.: impossible be strange attempts, to those That weigh their pains in sense; and do suppose what hath been cannot be : Who ever strove To show her merit, that did miss her love? The king's disease—my project may deceive me. But my intents are fix’d, and will not leave me.

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1 Lord. His love and wisdom,
Approv’d so to your majesty, unay plead
For amplest credence.
King. He hath arm'd our answer,
And Florence is denied before he comes :
Yet, for our gentlemen, that unean to see
The Tuscan service, freely have they leave
To stand on either part.
2 Lord. It may well serve
A nursery to our gentry, who are sick
For breathing and exploit.
King. What's he comes here f

Enter BERTRAM, LAF eu, and PA Rolles.

1 Lord. It is the count Rousillon, my good
Young Bertram. (lord,
King. Youth, thou bear'st thy father's face;
Frank nature, rather curious than in haste,
Hath well compos'd thee. Thy father’s moral
parts
May'st thou inherit too ! Welcome to Paris.
}, r. My thanks and duty are your majesty’s.
Aing. I would I had that corporal soundness
now,
As when thy father, and myself, in friendship
First tried our soldiership ! He did look san
Into the service of the time, and was
Discipled of the bravest : he lasted long ;
But on us both did haggish age steal on,
And wore us out of act. It much repairs * me
To talk of your good father: In his youth
He had the wit, which I can well observe
To-day in our young lords; but they may jest,
Till their own scorn return to them unnoted,
Ere they can hide their levity in honour.
So like a courtier, contempt not bitterness
Were in his pride or sharpness; if they were,
His equal had awak'd then ; and his honour,
Clock to itself, knew the true inimute when
Exception bid him speak, and, at this time,
His tongue obey'd hist band : who were below
He used as creatures of another place ; [hilu
And bow’d his eminent top to their low ranks,
Making them proud of his humility,
In their poor praise he humbled : Such a man
Misht be a copy to these younger times;
which, follow’d well, would demonstrate them
But goers backward. [now
Ber. His good remembrance, Sir,
Lies richer in your thoughts, than on his tomb ;
So in approof: lives not his epitaph,
As in your royal speech.
King. 'Would, I were with him He would
always say,
(Methinks, I hear him now ; his plausive words
He scatter'd not in ears, but grafted them,
To grow there, and to bear,J-Let me not live, -
Thus his good inelancholy oft began,
On the catastrophe and beel of pastine,
When it was out, - Let me not lite, quoth he,
After my flame tacks oil, to be the snuff
Of younger spirits, whose upprehensite senses
All but new things disdain ; whose judgments
are
Mere fathers of their garments ; $ whose con-
stancies
Expire before their fashions :—This he wish'd.
I, after him, do after him wish too,
Since I nor wax nor honey can bring home,
I quickly were dissolved from my hive,
To give some labourers room.
2 Lord. You are lov'd, Sir ;

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count, Since the physician at your father's died ? He was inuch fam'd. Ber. Some six months since, my lord. King. If he were living, I would try him yet;

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