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But Ine gods of the pagan shall never profane
The shrine where Jehovah disdain'd not to reign ;
And scatter'd and scorn'd as Thy people may be,
Our worship, oh Father, is only for Thee.

BY THE RIVERS OF BABYLON WE SAT DOWN AND

WEPT.
WE sate down and wept by the waters

Of Babel, and thought of the day
When our foe, in the hue of his slaughters,

Made Salem's high places his prey ;
And ye, oh her desolate daughters !

Were scatter'd all weeping away.
While sadly we gazed on the river

Which rollid on in freedom below,
They demanded the song; but, oh never

That triumph the stranger shall know !
May this right hand be wither'd for ever,

Ero it string our high harp for the foe!
On the willow that harp is suspended,

Oh Salem ! its sound should be free;
And the hour when thy glories were ended

But left me that token of thee :
And ne'er shall its soft tones be blended

With the voice of the spoiler by me !

THE DESTRUCTION OF SENNACHERIB.
THE Assyrian came down like the wolf on the fold,
And his cohorts were gleaming in purple and gold ;
And the sheen of their spears was like stars on the sea,
When the blue wave rolls nightly on deep Galilee.
Like the leaves of the forest when Summer is green,
That host with their banners at sunset were seen:
Like the leaves of the forest when Autumn hath blown,
That host on the morrow lay wither'd and strown.
For the Angel of Death spread his wings on the blast,
And breathed in the face of the foe as he pass'd ;
And the eyes of the sleepers wax'd deadly and chill,
And their hearts but once heaved, and for ever grew still!
And there lay the steed with his nostrils all wide,
But through it there roll'd not the breath of his pride :
And the foam of his gasping lay white on the turf,
And cold as the spray of the rock-beating suuf.
And there lay the rider distorted and pale,
With the dew on his brow and the rust on his mail;
And the tents were all silent, the banners alone,
Tue lances unlifted, the trumpet unblown.

And whe widows of Ashur are loud in their wail,
And the idols are broke in the temple of Baal ;
And the might of the Gentile, unsmote by the sword,
Hath melted like snow in the glance of the Lord !

A SPIRIT PASSED BEFORE ME.

FROM JOB.

A SPIRIT pass'd before me: I beheld
The face of immortality unveil'd-
Deep sleep came down on every eye save mine
And there it stood,--all formless—but divine :
Along my bones the creeping flesh did quake ;
And as my damp hair stiffen'd, thus it spake :
Is man more just than God? Is man more puro
Than He who deems even Seraphs insecure ?
Creatures of clay-vain dwellers in the dust!
The moth survives you, and are ye more just!
Things of a day! you wither ere the night,
Heedless and blind to Wisdom's wasted light !”

STANZAS FOR MUSIC.
TIERE be none of Beauty's daughters

With a magic like thee;
And like music on the waters

Is thy sweet voice to me:
When, as if its sound were causing
The charmed ocean's pausing,
The waves lie still and gleaming,
And the lull’d winds seem dreaming.
And the midnight moon is weaving

Her bright chain o'er the deep ;
Whose breast is gently heaving,

As an infant's asleep :
So the spirit bows before thee,
To listen and adore thes;
With a full but soft emo:ion,
Like the swell of Summer's ocean.

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ADVERTISEMENT. " The grand army of the Turks (in 1715), under the Prime Vizier, to open to themselves a way into the heart of the Morea, and to form the siege of Napoli di Romania, the most considerable place in all that coun. try,* thought it best, in the first place, to attack Corinth, upon which they made several storms. The garrison being weakened, and the governor seeing it was impossible to hold out against so mighty a force, thought it fit to beat a parley: but while they were treating about the articles, one of the magazines in the Turkish army, wherein they had six hundred barrels of powder, blew up by accident, whereby six or seven hundred men were killed; which so enraged the infidels, that they would not grant any capitulation, but stormed the place with so much fury, that they took it, and put most of the garrison, with Signior Minotti, the governor, to the sword. The rest, with Antonio Bembo, proveditor extriordinary, were made prisoners of war.”-History of the Turks, vol. iii. p. 151.

• Napoli di Romania is not now the most considerable place in the Morea, but Tripolitza, where the Pacha resides, and maintains his government. Napoli is near Argos. I visited all three in 1810-11 ; and, in the course of journeying through the country from my first arrival in 1809, I crossed the Isthinus eight times in my way from Attica to tho Morea over the mountains, or in the other direction, when passing from the Gulf of Athens to that of Lepanto. Both the routes are picturesque and beautiful, though very different: that by sea has more sameness ; but the voyage being always within sight of land, and often very near it, presents many attractive views of the islands Salamis, Agina. Poro, & and the coast of the contingnt.-B.

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THE SIEGE OF CORINTH.

I.
MANY a vanish'd year and age,
And tempest's breath, and battle's rage,
Have swept o'er Corinth; yet she stands
A fortress form'd to Freedom's hands.
The whirlwind's wrath, the earthquake's shock
Have left untouch'd her hoary rock,
The keystone of a land, which still,
Though fall'n, looks proudly on that hill,
The landmark to the double tide
That: urpling rolls on either side,
As if their waters chafed to meet,
Yet pause and crouch beneath her feet.
But could the blood before her sbed
Since first Timoleon's brother bled,
Or baffled Persia's despot fled,
Arise from out the earth which drank
The stream of slaughter as it sank,
That sanguine ocean would o'erflow
Her isthmus idly spread below:
Or could the bones of all the slain,
Who perish'd there, be piled again,
That rival pyramid would rise
Mure mountain-like, through those clear skiesz.
Than yon tower-capp'd Acropolis,
Which seems the very clouds to kiss.

II.
On dur. Cithæron's ridge appears
The gleam of twice ten thousand spears ;
And downward to the Isthmian plain,
From shore to shore of either main,
The tent is pitch'd, the crescent shines
Along the Moslem's leaguering lines ;
And the dusk Spahi's bands advance
Beneath each bearded pacha's glance;
And far and wide as eye can reach
The turban'd cohorts throng the beach ;
And there the Arab's camel kneels,
And there his steed the Tartar wheels ;
The Turcoman hath left his herd,*

The sabre round his loins to gird ;
Tho Ufe of the Turcomans is wandering and patriarchal: they dwell in long-

And there the volleying thunders pour,
Till waves grow smoother to the roar.
The trench is dug, the cannon's breath
Wings the far hissing globe of death;
Fast whirl the fragments from the wall,
Which crumbles with the ponderous bail;
And from that wall the foe replies,
O'er dusty plain and smoky skies,
With fires that answer fast and well
The summons of the Infidel.

III.
But near and nearest to the wall
Of those who wish and work its fall,
With deeper skill in war's black art
Than Othman's sons, and high of heart
As any chief that ever stood
Triumphant in the fields of blood ;
From post to post, and deed to deed,
Fast spurring on his reeking steed,
Where sallying ranks the trench assail,
And make the foremost Moslem quail;
Or where the battery, guarded well,
Remains as yet impregnable,
Alighting cheerly to inspire
The soldier slackening in his fire;
The first and freshest of the host
Which Stamboul's sultan there can boast,
"To guide the follower o'er the field,
"To point the tube, the lance to wield,
Or whirl around the bickering blade ;-
Was Alp, the Adrian renegade!

IV.
From Venice-once a race of worth
His gentle sires—he drew his birth ;
But late an exile from her shore,
Against his countrymen he bore
The arms they taught to bear; and now
The turban girt his shaven brow.
Through many a change had Corinth pase'
With Greece to Venice' rule at last;
And here, before her walls, with those
To Greece and Venice equal foes,
He stood a foe, with all the zeal
Which young and fiery converts feel,
Within whose heated bosom throngs
The memory of a thousand wrongs.
To him bad Venice ceased to be
Her ancient civic boast-"the Free ;"
And in the palace of St. Mark
Unnamed accusers in the dark
Within the “ Lion's mouth” had placed
A charge against him uneffaced :

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