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From the hour in which Mary heard these Divine promises—from the instant in which, saved by faith and love, her heavenly Master bade her “ go in peace,” she forgot her cares, and “ chose that good part which could not be taken from her.” She supplied His wants from her own substance, and sat an attentive listener at His feet. She followed Him in life-she bewailed Him in death. And, as at an earlier period she had anointed Him in preparation of His burial, so at the conclusion of His days, she was one of those who brought spices and ointment to embalm the body of Him whom she had loved so much. Yes—when the apostles fled at the dreadful hour of His crucifixion—when Peter thrice denied Him—thrice attested with oaths his ignorance of “the man”—she stood nigh, mindful of his benevolence, and wishing in vain to share His sorrows and participate His pains. Before His disciples had summoned courage to approach the tomb, with the intrepidity natural to one that "loveth much ” she stood beside it. To her our Lord first made His appearance after His glorious conquest over death; and, as a special instance of His approbation, despatched her to inform His disciples.

The Roman Catholic, resting on his vain traditions, believes that Mary, after the ascension of her blessed Lord, retired to Marseilles, a seaport of France; where she occupied a cave and

lived the life of an ascetic; macerating her frame, and giving herself up to voluntary torture. But idle and unnecessary is this addition to her story! To infinitely greater advantage did she show her repentance, when following her Saviour and actively ministering to His wants, than when surrendering herself to sloth and unprofitable austerities ; she consumed life instead of employing it; and wasted those hours, in which she might have been a useful helpmate of the apostles, in squalid misery.

But pass we these futile narrations. Whether true or false, they have not the authority of Scripture; and, admitting them to be true, the lesson which they give is very far from scriptural.

Mary had committed many enormities—"her sins were many :" but, at length, she had “grace to repent;” and she turned with her whole heart and soul to God. Because of this, “her sins were forgiven.” Here is the great lesson to be derived from our subject. But, alas ! the weakness of humanity so imposes upon better feelings, that even this high and comfortable doctrine is often made the vehicle of sin. That God is good and merciful is the confession of thousands : but thousands also forget that God is also just. Justice is as much His attribute as mercy : and, therefore, though He promises to forgive the penitent through the mediation of His blessed

From the hour in which Mary heard these Divine promises—from the instant in which, saved by faith and love, her heavenly Master bade her “go in peace,” she forgot her cares, and “chose that good part which could not be taken from her.” She supplied His wants from her own substance, and sat an attentive listener at His feet. She followed Him in life-she bewailed Him in death. And, as at an earlier period she had anointed Him in preparation of His burial, so at the conclusion of His days, she was one of those who brought spices and ointment to embalm the body of Him whom she had loved so much. Yes—when the apostles fled at the dreadful hour of His crucifixion—when Peter thrice denied Him—thrice attested with oaths his ignorance of “the man"-she stood nigh, mindful of his benevolence, and wishing in vain to share His sorrows and participate His pains. Before His disciples had summoned courage to approach the tomb, with the intrepidity natural to one that “loveth much ” she stood beside it. To her our Lord first made His appearance after His glorious conquest over death; and, as a special instance of His approbation, despatched her to inform His disciples.

The Roman Catholic, resting on his vain traditions, believes that Mary, after the ascension of her blessed Lord, retired to Marseilles, a seaport of France; where she occupied a cave and

lived the life of an ascetic; macerating her frame, and giving herself up to voluntary torture. But idle and unnecessary is this addition to her story! To infinitely greater advantage did she show her repentance, when following her Saviour and actively ministering to His wants, than when surrendering herself to sloth and unprofitable austerities ; she consumed life instead of employing it; and wasted those hours, in which she might have been a useful helpmate of the apostles, in squalid misery.

But pass we these futile narrations. Whether true or false, they have not the authority of Scripture; and, admitting them to be true, the lesson which they give is very far from scriptural.

Mary had committed many enormities~" her sins were many :” but, at length, she had “grace to repent;" and she turned with her whole heart and soul to God. Because of this, “her sins were forgiven.” Here is the great lesson to be derived from our subject. But, alas ! the weakness of humanity so imposes upon better feelings, that even this high and comfortable doctrine is often made the vehicle of sin. That God is good and merciful is the confession of thousands : but thousands also forget that God is also just. Justice is as much His attribute as mercy : and, therefore, though He promises to forgive the penitent through the mediation of His blessed

Son. Tet He will not forgive those who sin that “ grace may abound." It is true that “ to whom little is forgiven, the same loveth little ; " yet it by no means follows, that they must love who are forgiren much; or, because they are great transgressors, they must be forgiven. Let those who with such feelings continue in error, always recollect that sin hardens the heart, and frequently incapacitates a person from the work of his salvation. Who knows that sudden death will not cut away the porter of repentance ?that time will not take away the inclination ? One or the other is certain ; and they who wish their many sins to be forgiven must commence immediately “the labour of love." Let them fly, like Mary, to the feet of their indulgent Saviour; let the tear of contrition flow uninterruptedly down their cheeks; nor let them be contented with idle inert and languid prayers, but rather, with Mary Magdalene, bring forth the precious ointment-use active measures to secure the attention and blessing of Christ. Let them be diligent in good works; let them “yield themselves unto God, as those that are alive from the dead, and their members as instruments of righteousness unto God.”

It is by these means only that we become new creatures; that we feel the disposition to exert those faculties which are entrusted to our care and guidance. We live in an evil age-amid

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