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TREBONIUS.

What a Night is this ! There's two or three of us have seen ftrange Sights!

CASSIUS Well, let 'em see them. Tell me, am I staid for 3

TRE BONIUS.

You are.
O CASSIUS, if you could prevail with BRUTUS;
He, as a Band, would tye our Party strong.

CASCA.
Why is not BRUTUS one? I thought him sure.

CASSIUS.
Be you content. TRÉBONIUS, take this Scrole,
And look you lay it in the ready way,
Where BRUTUS needs must find it; then, throw this
In at his Window ; set this up with Wax
Upon old Brutus’ Statue : all this done,
Repair to POMPEY's Porch, where you shall find uś,
Is DECIUS BRUTUS, and MARULLUS there?

TREBONIUS.
All, all are there, except METELLUS CIMBER;
And he is gone to seek you at your House.

CASSIUS.

CASSIUS.

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Away then ; lose no time: Come, my good CASCA,
We will go visit Brutus yet e'er Day :
Three Parts of that good Man are ours already,
And, on the next Assault, he yields entire.

CASCA.
Oh, he fits high in all the People's Hearts.

CASSIUS
So, that which would appear Offence in us,
His Countenance, like the great Art of Chymists,
Will change to Virtue, and to noble Deeds.

CASCA.
Him and his Worth, and our great need of him,
You have consider'd well. Come let's make hafte.

CASSIUS.
The Sun that sees him next, shall find him ours.

[Exeunt.

Instead

Instead of the Mufick usually play'd between the

Ats, the following Verses are, after this A&t. to be sung by a Chorus representing the Roman People.

First CHORUŞ.

WHI

1.
HITHER is Roman Honour gone?

Where is our antient Virtue now }
That Valour, which fo bright has shone,
And with the Wings of Conquest flown,

Must to a haughty Master bow:
Who, with our Toil, our Blood, and all we have

befide, Gorges his ill-got Pow'r, his Humour, and his Pride,

II.
Fearless he will his Life expose ;

So does a Lion, or a Bear ;
His very Virtues threaten those,

Who more his bold Ambition fear.

How stupid Wretches we appear, Who round the World for Wealth and Empire

roam ; Yet never, never think what Slaves we are at home!

I

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III.
Did Men, for this, together join ;

Quitting the free wild Life of Nature ?
What other Beast did e'er design

The setting up his Fellow-Creature ?

And of two Mischiefs chuse the greater ?
Oh, rather than be Slaves to bold imperious Men,
Give us our Wildness, and our Woods, our Hutts,

and Caves agen.

IV.
There secure from lawless Sway,
Out of Pride or Envy's way ;
Living up to Nature's Rules,

Not deprav'd by Knaves and Fools;
Happily we all should live, and harmless as our

Sheep,
And at last as calmly die, as Infants fall ancep.

Vol. I.

R

ACT

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ACT II. SCENE I.
BRUTUS alone in his House undreft.
E would be King; nay will be, if he lives;

This most important Day disclos'd that Secret :
Ambition, like a mad tempestuous Sea,
Swell’d him above the Bounds of wise dissembling,
And ended all our Hopes of future Freedom.
Justice, and Liberty ! Farewell for ever!
If Brutus is thus sensible of Slav'ry,
I, who am CÆSAR's Friend, and partial for him
What is it then to others ? to those thousands,
Who must lie heap'd in Dust, to raise him higher ?
But my own Words reproach me ; can I call
My self his Friend, and yet consent to kill him?
By Heav'n, no less than plain Ingratitude !
That heavy Load presses my tender Mind;
I cannot bear it. Nay, this CÆSAR also
Is humbly brave, and gentle in his Greatness;
Apt for Converse, and casy of Access;
Skill'd in all Arts, matchless in Eloquence ;
In War and Business indefatigable.
Bounteous as Nature, merciful as Heav'n;
In all, sublime, high, and unparallel'd.

Yet

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