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Oct, 13, 1832, pardoned.

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85 221 Male Erie county, N. Y.
86 281 Union county, Pa.
87|19

Germany
88 27

Franklin county, Pa.
89 27 York county, Pa.
90 391 Washington county, Pa.
9132 Albany, N. Y.
92 39

New Jersey
93 42 Bedford county, Pa.
94 261 Indiana county, Pa.
95 24 Indiana county, Pa.
96 22 Washington county, Pa.
97 22 Chester county, Pa.
9813 Washington county, Pa.
99/361 England
100 251 New York
101 21

Kentucky
102/19 Green county, Ohio
103 48 Baltimore
104 43 Luzerne county, Pa.
105 33 Northumberland co. Pa.
106 45

County Down, Ireland
10728 City of New York
108 361 Northumberland co. Pa.
10920 Germany
110 46 On the Atlantic Ocean
111391

Cecil county, Maryland
11250] County Caven, Ireland

August 14, 1832
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November 16,
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July 24, 1827
Escap'd Nov.21,1828
Recomm'dDec, 16,"321

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6 months
1 year
13 months
year

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Larceny

Q. S. Crawford county
Passing count'ft notes Q. S. Huntingdon county
Larceny

Q. S. Westmoreland county
Horse stealing Q. S. Bedford county
Larceny

Q. S. Bedford county
Larceny

Q. S. Beaver county
Larceny

Q. S. Beaver county
Larceny

Q. S. Beaver county
Arson

0. T. Venango county
Larceny

Q. S. Indiana county
Larceny

Q. S. Indiana county
Larceny

Mayor's Court, Pittsburg
Larceny

Mayor's Court, Pittsburg
Larceny

Q. S. Washington county
Larceny

Mayor's Court, Pittsburg
Larceny

Mayor's Court, Pittsburg
Larceny

Mayor's Court, Pittsburg
Larceny

Q. S. Allegheny county
Larceny

Q, S, Allegheny county
Conspiracy

Q. S. Huntingdon county
Conspiracy

Q. S. Huntingdon county
Larceny

Mayor's Court, Pittsburg
Larceny

Mayor's Court, Pittsburg
Larceny

Q. S. Centre county
Larceny

Q. S. Allegheny county
Larceny

Q. S. Allegheny county
Assault,&c.intent to kill Q. S. Huntingdon county
Horse stealing Mayor's Court, Pittsburg

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Remaining in prison on the first of January, 1832, 64 prisoners-Received into the penitentiary during the year 1832, 48—Total, 112. Discharged during the year 1832, by
expiration of sentence, 12; by pardon, 10; died 2-24. Remaining in prison on the first day of January, 1833, 88 prisoners. White males remaining in prison January 1st, 1833,
74-Colored males, 12-Total number of males, 86, White females remaining in prison January 1st, 1833, 1-Colored female, 1-Total number of females, 2. Whole number
of males, 86_Whole number of females, 2.- Total, 88.

247

FIRING CANNON ON THE FOURTH OF JULY.

1833.)

C.

of Erie, on this day. The justice fined the persons who WESTERS PENITENTIARY, OR PA. bad fired--they appealed, and the case as it came up in

January 1, A. D. 1833. the common pleas is thus given in the Erie Observer. To the Inspectors:

Shippen, president judge. I have the honor to report, that during the past year, there have been in the Western Penitentiary of Penn

Com. Pleas, Erie county, Aug. Term, 1833. sylvania 96 cases of sickness, and two deaths. It will Samuel Agnew, who sues for himself, as well as for the

Benjamin Deffinbaugh et al. Plaintiffs in error vs. be seen by the list annexed, that there has been a dimi. nution from last year, of cases of rheumatism, probably This was a certiorari to William Kelly, Esq. Justice of

Commonwealth. from the greater dryness of the cells; and that the cases

the Peace. of diarrhæa were three times as numerous as in the preceding year. How far this increase of diarrhæa may be tice, it appeared that Samuel Agnew brought suit to re

From the return of the proceedings had before the JusAccounted for from the gradual increasing foulness, unavoidable in the present arrangements, and how far it cover the penalty of firing a gun within a borough town, may have been owing to the peculiar influence of the under an old act of Assembly, enacted in the year 1750. general atmosphere last summer, it is difficult to say. 1833, were members of a volunteer company, and on tha

Benjamin Deffinbaugh and others, on the 4th of July, Neither can this prison, as now constructed, afford a fair trial of the effects of confinement on the health of day, in pursuance of the orders of their Captain (Howconvicts. The want ot ventilation; the retention

of foul ell) had fired a cannon within the borough of Erie sixnight pans in the cells for twelve hours at a time; and teen times. To the information filed by Agnew, they the offensiveness of the privies, contribute no little to severally plead guilty, whereupon judgment was given disorder the health I beg leave to recommend that the against them for five shillings for each and every time, cells be so constructed as to admit of ventilation, and of and cost of suit. Ramsey, Barrett, and Galbraith, apthe excrement passing off by means of water closets to peared as counsel for the defendants below. Walker a sewer leading to the river; the sewer to be kept con- and Riddle for the Commonwealth. The following er. stantly clean, and for that purpose, that some means of rors were thereupon assigned by the counsel for the de. furnishing a more abundant supply of water be provid. fendants below, to the judgment of the justice: ed. Should the cells be re-modelled and enlarged to

1st. The offence is entirely statutary, and is not in the plan of those of the Eastern Penitentiary, there will the words of the statute, in either the information, war. be no need of an infirmary; the sick can then be attend. rant, or conviction with sufficient precision. It is not ed in their cells, and the necessity of removing them to the borough of Erie-nor that Erie is a county town, or

stated that the alleged offence was committed “within" a larger room will no longer exist-an operation which other town or borough within this (province) commonought always, if possible to be avoided, as equally in.

wealth. convenient and hazardous, in the discipline of a prison. 2. There can be but one offence committed, and conI beg leave, however, to recommend the erection of a bath

house, in connexion with the undressing room, af: sequently but one penalty, and the conviction of the ter the plan of the building for similar purposes, in the justice is for 16 offences committed at one time. penitentiary at Philadelphia.

3. The conviction is too uncertain in not stating the It is my opinion that a prison constructed,

ventilated, is left as a matter of future calculation and computation.

entire amount, he adjudged the defendants to pay. It and supplied with water, on the plan of the Eastern Pe. nitentiary, would lessen the expenses to the several

4. The conviction is also too uncertain to be carried counties, not only in enabling the institution to obtain into effect in being rendered in a foreign currency, and more labor from the convicts, but in lessening disease, not reduced to any certain amount in currency of the and of course the annual expense for medicines.

United States.

5. The law under which the conviction took place is Very respectfully, W. H. DENNY, M. D.,

unconstitutional and obsolete.

6. The conviction is at all events void as it respects Physician of the W. P. of Pennsylvania.

costs. LIST OF CASES OF SICKNESS, FOR 1832.

7. There was no cause of action.

8. The judgment was illegal. Diarrhæa

36

Ramsey on behalf of the defendants below, was about Chronic rheumatism

11

proceeding to argue the points before the court, and to Obstinate costiveness

15

cite the law, when he was stopped by Dyspepsia

2

The Court. – We do not wish to hear counsel on behalf Syphilitic rheumatism 2

of the defendants until the prosecutor shows that the King's evil

3

act of 1750 is still in force. It is our impression that Eruptions of the skin

3

the act is in this instance obsolete, and on this point we Sore mouth

3

will hear the prosecutor. Inflamed eyes

1

Walker.-i'he act of assembly has never been reNeuralgia

1

pealed, and convictions have been had under it. Coun. Consumption (fatal)

2

sel around me say they know of convictions within their Ague & fever, originating east

recollections. The act is not unconstitutional, &c. of the Allegheny mount's 4

The Court. — The common custom practised in, uniGravel

1

versally, for fifty-seven years, of firing cannon on the Bloody urine

1

4th July, has become common law; and this is the first Epilepsy

1

time that ever a court of justice has heard of a prosecuRupture

1

tion for firing cannon on that day. On a certiorari, Bronchitis

1

where it is reversed, it is common law for the prosecu. Pain in the breast

2

tor to pay the costs. Judgment of Justice Kelly reInflammation of the lungs 1

versed. Influenza

5 Sick on the 31st day of December, 1832, none.

We have been furnished with the following opinion From the Harrisburg Chronicle.

of the Hon. Judge Shippen, in a case which has recent

ly been before our readers. We refer to the prosecuFIRING CANNON ON THE FOURTH OF JULY, \tion of the gunners in an artillery company, for aiding

A suit was instituted in Erie county before a justice in the celebration of our nauon's anniversary by the against certain persons for firing a cannon in the streets' firing of cannon.

ADSM.

No.

Diffenbaugh and others,

“I now proceed to the estimate of this work, accor. CERTIORARI.

ding to the plan above detailed. In this estimate, a The Commonwealth.

provision is made for clearing the bed of the river from There are eight exceptions in this case.

Without obstructions made by the present wing dams; and also of considering the others, the conviction is to be reversed clearing the shores of standing and fallen timber, as chiefly on two grounds.

well as for removing the few snags which now exist. 1. The judgment is vague and uncertain, in not stat. No provision, however, is made for the damage done ing with precision the amount which defendants are ad. to the two river mills which will be destroyed, and two judged to pay. Nor does the record state to whom the or three mills on the tributary creeks which will be fine is payable, whether to the borough of Erie, or to somewhat injured by the improvement. The cheapMill creek township; within which Erie is or lately was ness with which steam engines are made, and the prosituated, and of which the borough of Erie lately form- fusion of fuel, have rendered the use of this species of ed part; nor does it state what sum or part, or to what power so economical, that the water mills on the river person as informant, the fine or fincs, whatever they be, have been gradually loosing their value, and, of the are to be paid. The execution must follow the judg- number which formerly existed, only two now remain. ment, and it will not do to leave all these matters to the These reasons justify the conclusion that the claim for constable to search up and decide, among the several damages that can equitably be made, must be small. old laws on this subject. It would be to make the con. But, as this amount depends on the arbitrary value atstable a judge on difficult points. Further. For these tached to their property, by individuals, it could not fifty-seven years, ever since the 4th of July, 1776, it be introduced with propriety into this estimate. has been so universal a practice throughout the whole land, to fire cannon and musketry, by the volunteer com. panies in celebration of that day, that we might say it

DOVOL * * has become the common law of the land, by common and universal consent, superceeling the old statute and the statute of Geo. I. therein referred to. A much shorter time has fixed and established a common law among us different from the English law, by a change of the nature of our government, and under our constitution of 1790. I mention, for instance, the payment of fees to Prothontary not becoming due till the termina. tion of suit. The failing party, in certiorari, generally having to pay the costs, although the law is different in writs of error; and this has received legislative sanction by act of 1810. This is probably the first attempt, since the establishment of our government, to restrain the celebration of the fourth of July, by a prosecution in the name of the commonwealth. If an individual injury had been done, there is always redress by a civil action for damages. But that is not now the question. It is whether the citizens may celebrate the anniversary of Independence as they have used to do for upwards of fifty years, without a petition to his Excellency, the Governor of the state, for leave to do so. It would be somewhat novel for the Governor of Pennsylvania to be granting letters of license, pursuant to the statute of 1752 for that purpose. If that statute is generally in force, his leave might, without any restrained presump: tion, be presumed universal in the state for that special occasion.

The law is plainly laid down in Hawkins, P. C. that the same strictness required in indictments extend to all summary convictions, and it is right it should be so, particularly when there is no appeal from the judgment of a single magistrate. This conviction is therefore set aside.

HENRY SHIPPEN. To be filed by Mr. Walker, counsel for the Commonwealth.

8. Forsyth's old dam
7. Baldwin's dam
6. Frey's Shoals
5. Parkinson's upper dam
4. Fishpot ripple
3. Pine Run ripple
2. (Braddock's lower ripple
1. M'Clurg's mill,

Situation.

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11
7
2
8
4 1260

880
1320
1620
210
60

M, Yds.

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from last
Distance

00

52
43
38
27
19
16
10
2
M. Yds.

80
950
1450
130
270
270
60

Pittsb'g.

from Distance

burg, navigable for Steam Boats of 100 tons. Estimate of the Expense of rendering the Monongabela river, between Brownsville and Pitts

182
250
220
210
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320

446
Yards.

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Length. dam. Locks.
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Feet.
| 364 | 136,193

14,103
15,120
16,542
14,965
14,630
15,750
16,763
28,320
Dollars.

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From the Pittsburg Gazette. IMPROVEMENT OF THE MONONGAHELA

RIVER. The Hon. Andrew Stewart has furnished to the edi. tors of the Pennsylvania Democrat, the report of the Engineers employed last summer in making a survey, plan, and estimate for the improvement of the river from this city to Brownsville. From this report we now extract the conclusion and the estimate. We will, perhaps, publish the whole report in our next paper.

In his note to the editors, Mr. Stewart says-"You will perceive that the President has declined deciding on the plan, until further surveys are made, which will be done this summer.” He also expresses the hope that appropriations, for the commencement of the work, will be made at the next session of Congress.

Estimate as above,

136,193 Lockage, 364 ft. at $1,600 per ft.

58,400 Excavation of channels, &c.

11, 200 Walling for sluices,

7,376 Clearing of river and banks,

8,000

221,169 Add 10 per cent for contingencies, 22,117 Total,

$245, 286 I was assisted in making the survey on which this report was founded, by Mr. J. W. Smith, to whose skill 1833.)

PROCEEDINGS OF COUNCILS.

249

and industry I am indebted for its completion in time to but that during the abstraction of all external objects prevent the rise of water, which took place early in and impressions from the senses in a sleeping state, the November, from depriving us of the results.

memory exerted itself with an intenseness that it could I am, very respectfully, sir,

not do in its waking state. He supposed that her hus. Your obedient servant,

band had informed her at some time of the situation of WM. HOWARD, the paper, and that the fact had become dormant in the

U. S. Civil Eng. memory until the dream called it up. To Lieut. Col. ARBERT,

Topographical Bureau, Washington. Washington City, Feb. 5, 1833.

Total,

24742

10575

Foreign,
Other Ports,
Pittsburg,
New York,
Baltimore,
Virginia,
North Carolina,
Georgia,
Florida,
Mobile,
South Carolina,
New Orleans,
FROM

50
1585

161
3468

595
3633
6615
8112
205
18

469
1004

655
1543
3989

429
2397
2

209
207
817
3026
1599
4517
4643
1367

9130
1832-33. (1831-32. 1830-31.j1829-30. 1828-29.

1065

98

30th, 1833, compared with the four preceding years.
Import of Cotton at this Port, from October 1, 1832, to September

IMPORT OF COTTON.
From the Commercial Herald.

25515

14946

15805

From the Christian Advocate and Journal.

ANECDOTES OF DR. RUSH. On Preaching.–The Doctor once informed me that when he was a young man, he bad been invited on some occasion to dine in company with Robert Morris, Esq. a man celebrated for the part he took in the American Revolution. It so happened that the company had waited some time for Mr. Morris, who on his appear. ance, apologized for detaining them, by saying that he had been engaged in reading a sermon of a clergyman who had just gone to England to receive orders. "Well, Mr. Morris," said the Doctor, “how did you like the sermon? I have heard it highly extolled.” “ Why, Doctor,” said he, “I did not like it at all. It's too smooth and tame for me.' "Mr. Morris,” replied the Doctor, “what sort of a sermon do you like?I like sir," replied Mr. M. "that kind of preaching which drives a man into one corner of his pew,and makes him think the devil is after him."

I heard him reprove his medical class once for restlessness, during one of his lectures, by saying: “Gen. tlemen, I fear I do not make you happy. The happy are always contented.” This gentle rebuke pleased me so well that after the lecture, I thanked him for it, ob. serving that when occasion should offer, I would try the effect of it on my.congregation. “No," said the Doctor, “I hope you will not. It is no compliment to a minister of the Gospel to reprove his congregation for The Export to Foreign ports from October 1, 1832, inattention. He should be able to keep their attention.” to September 30th, 1833, has been to Adding that “ Dr. M's congregations were always at

England,

4970 bales. tentive."

France,

117 Dr. Rush was perhaps one of the most untiring students that ever lived. Two young physicians were con

5087 versing in his presence once, and one of them said,

Same period, 1831-32, 3977 "When I finished my studies.-" “When you fi.

Same period, 1830–31,

3243 nished your studies!" said the Doctor abruptly, “Why

Same period, 1829-30,

2362 you must be a happy man to have finished so young.' I

Same period, 1828-29, 4001 do not expect to finish mine while I live.”

The stock remaining on sale on the 1st October, 1833, The writer once asked him how he had been able to was 791 bales against 459 bales in 1832, and 7181 collect such an immense amount of information and facts bales in 1831. Last year the manufactures were well as his publications and lectures contained.

supplied, at this time their stock is very low. “I have been enabled to do it," replied he, “by eco. nomising my time as Mr. Wesley did. I have not spent

From the Philadelphia Gazette. an hour in amusements for the last thirty years." And, taking a small note book from his pocket, and showing

PROCEEDINGS OF COUNCILS. it to me, he said, “I fill such a book as this once in a

Friday, October 11, 1833. week with observations and thoughts which occur to

The newly elected members of the Select and Comme, and acts collected in the rooms of my patients, and mon Councils, met in their respective chambers, at these are preserved and used.”

elven o'clock this morning. The I once heard the doctor relate the following dream

SELECT COUNCIL to show that the memory sometimes exerts itself more powerfully in our sleeping than our waking hours in Organized by electing Joseph R. Ingersoll, Esq. Precalling up things that have been forgotten. A gentle sident, who afier taking the chair, delivered a neat and man in Jersey, of large property had provided in his appropriate address, expressive of his thanks for the will, that his wife in connexion with a neighbor, should honor conferred, &c. After which the members took settle his estate. After his death, in fulfilling the in- the oath of qualification. tentions of his will, a certain important paper was mis. Joseph G. Clarkson was elected Clerk, and Lydia sing: Repeated and diligent search was made for it, R Bailey, Printer. but in vain. The widow at length dreamed that the The rules of intercourse adopted by the late Counsaid paper was in the bottom of a barrel in the garret, cils, were revived for the present Council, and Comcovered with a number of books. The dream made mon Council concurred in the motion. so strong an impression on her mind that she was in Communications were received from Richard Price, duced to make an examination; and there to her aston- and William M. Meredith, tendering their resignations isement she found the paper." The Doctor's explanation as trustees of the Girard College. was, that no supernatural agency had been employed, I A joint committee w.1s appointed to report on the Voz. XII.

32

unfinished business of the old Councils, proper for the

COMMON COUNCIL, action of the present Councils.

TROTH,

Chandler, Select Council concurred with the Common Council

Huston,

Smith, in the appointment of William Daugherty as Messen.

Gilder,

Yarnell, ger.

Toland,

M'Mullen, The President appointed the following gentlemen

White,

Wright, members of the Watering Cornmittee-Messrs. Weth

Kirk,

Firth, erill, Lewis, Groves and Jackson,and Common Council,

Hutchinson,

Warner, Messrs. McMullen, Byerly, Lancaster and Smith.

Montelius,

Schott, Messrs. Groves, McCready and Price, were appoint.

Lancaster,

Darrah. ed a Committee on City Improvements on the Schuyl.

Byerly, kill.

The Election was vive voce, and every member present, COMMON COUNCILS.

as his name was called, responded Was called to order by Dr. R M. Huston, on whose

JOIIN SWIFT. motion Herry Troth, Esq. was appointed to take the chair. The certificates of membership being read over,

The President of the joint meeting, Mr. Ingersoll, and ordered to be recorded, the Mayor of the city, on having announced to the members the result of the motion of Mr. Chandler, was introduced, and the mem. Election, Messrs. Groves and Byerly were appointed a bers duly qualified. Common Council then proceeded committee to wait on the Mayor elect,announce to him to the choice of a President, which resulted in the the result of the vote, and request him to attend in the unanimous election of Henry Troth, who on being con. Council Chamber, and be qualified in presence of the ducted to the chair, returned thanks for the distinction, people and their representatives. and declared his determination to discharge the duties

On the introduction of the Mayor, Councils rose, and of his office with entire impartiality.

the President announced to him his election. The ReRobert Hare, jr. was duly elected Clerk; William corder, Joseph M’llvaine, Esq. then administered to Daugherty Messenger, and Lydia R. Bailey, Printer the Mayor elect the oath of office-which bound him to and Stationer.

respect the Constitution of the United States, and the Messrs. Troth, McMullin, Chandler, and Huston, Constitution of the State of Pennsylvania, and faithfulwere elected Commissioners of the Girard Trust, by ly discharge the duties of Mayor of the city of Pliilathe Common Council, and Messrs. Lippincott, Lewis, delphia. Eyre and Meredith, by the Select Council,

The Mayor then expressed his thanks to the CounMessrs. Gilder, Byerly, Smith and Ilutchinson, were cils for this renewed instance of their confidence, and appointed by Common Council, as members of the expressed his determination to devote his attention er. building committee of the Girard College.

clusively to the public service. On motion, both Councils resolved to meet on Tues- Having subscribed the usual obligation, the Mayor day next, at 12 o'clock, for the election of a Mayor of then retired. the city.

CHOICE OF TRUSTEES. A special meeting of Councils was held October 14th, After the Election and qualification of the Mayor, afternoon. On motion, the resolution before the last the Councils proceeded, in joint ballot, to elect TrusCouncils, authorizing the Mayor to draw his warrant on tees in the place of Messrs. Price and Meredith, elected the Treasurer of the Girard Estate, for $10,000 to be to Council. When it appeared that appropriated to the city improvements on the Schuyl.

SAMUEL V. MENRICK, kill, was referred to a joint committee of two members from each council. Committee of Common Council,

was chosen, for one year, in the place of Richard Messrs Huston and Chandler.

Price; and The petition of Samuel Geiss, an item of unfinished

JAMES Gowan, business, was referred to a special committee.

was chosen, for three years, in the place of Wm. M. On motion, the subject of purchasing additional co. Meredith. pies of Girard's will, for the use of the new members, The business of the joint meeting having been acwas referred to the Library committee, with power to complished, the Select Council proceeded to their act.

Chamber, and the President announced his appointment The following named gentlemen were appointed a of Standing and Joint committees; and sent 10 Common committee to take charge of the Girard lands in Penn- Council an amendment to the Wills' Hospital Ordisylvania out of Philadelphia county-from the Select nance. Council, Messrs. Groves, Lippincott, and Neff; from In Common Councils, the Paving Committee was the Common Council, Messrs. Toland, Gilder, and filled up. Councils, adjourned to Friday evening. Huston. Several other committees were appointed in the Common Council, which will be published when THE COMMISSIONERS OF THE GIRARD completed by the Select Council.

TRUST. Councils adjourned until to.morrow morning at 12 The new commissioners assembled Oct. 15th, at their o'clock, to elect a Mayor, and two Commissioners of room. The members are, Joshua Lippincott, Manuel the Girard College, in the place of Messrs Price, and Ayre, Henry Troth, Laurence Lewis, Robert McMulMeredith.

len, Joseph R. Chandler, Wm. M. Meredith, Dr. R. M.

Huston, and his honor the Mayor, ex officio. The board ELECTION OF A MAYOR.

proceeded to the election of officers, when the followOct. 15th, at noon, the Councils held a joint meeting ing gentlemen were unanimously re-elected. to elect the Mayor of the city, for the ensuing year;

President-Joshua Lippincott. and also two trustees of the Girard College for Orphans.

Secretary-Morgan Ash.

Agent for Farms-George Bastian. The following members were present, of the

The following committees were appointed by the
SELECT COUNCIL.

President.
INGERSOLL,
Groves,

On Real Estate - Messrs. Troth, McMullen and Hus.
Lewis,
Worrell,

ton.
M'Credy,
Meredith,

Finance and Accounts --Eyre, Lewis aad Meredith.
Price,
Lippincott,

Farms and Lots in the County --Swift, Chandler and
Еуге, ,
Jackson,

Lippincott.--U. S. Gazette.

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