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Paris passes over.

Pan. Swords ? any thing, he cares not : an the devil come to him, it's all one: By god's lid, it does one's heart good :-Yonder comes Paris, yonder comes Paris : look ye yonder, niece; Is't not a gallant man too, is't not ?-Why, this is brave now.-Who said, he came hurt home to-day? he's not hurt: why, this will do Helen's heart good now. Ha! 'would I could see Troilus now !-you shall see Troilus anon,

CRES. Who's that?

HELENUS passes over.

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Pan. That's Helenus, -I marvel, where Troilus is :- That's Helenus ;-I think he went not forth to-day :- That's Helenus.

CREs. Can Helenus fight, uncle ?

Pan. Helenus ? no;-yes, he'll fight indifferent well :-1 marvel, where Troilus is! -Hark; do

you not hear the people cry, Troilus ?-Helenus is a priest.

CRES. What sneaking fellow comes yonder ?

TROILUS passes over.

Pan. Where? yonder ? that's Deiphobus : 'Tis Troilus ! there's a man, niece !-Hem!-Brave Troilus! the prince of chivalry !

CRES. Peace, for shame, peace!

Pan. Mark him; note him ;-O brave Troilus! -look well upon him, niece; look you, how his sword is bloodied, and his helm more hack'd than Hector's;* And how he looks, and how he goes ! O admirable youth! he ne'er saw three and twenty. Go thy way Troilus, go thy way; had I a sister were a grace, or a daughter a goddess, he should take his

choice. O admirable man! Paris ?- Paris is dirt to him; and, I warrant, Helen, to change, would give an eye to boot."

Forces pass over the Stage.

CRES. Here come more.

PAN. Asses, fools, dolts! chaff and bran, chaff and bran! porridge after meat! I could live and die i'the eyes of Troilus. Ne'er look, ne'er look; the eagles are gone; crows and daws, crows and daws! I had rather be such a man as Troilus, than Agamemnon and all Greece.

CRĖS. There is among the Greeks, Achilles; a better man than Troilus.

Pan. Achilles ? a drayman, a porter, a very camel.

CRES. Well, well.

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how his sword is bloodied,] So, Lydgate, describing Troilus, in a couplet that reminds us of Dryden, or Pope:

“ He was so ferse they might him not withstand,

“ When that he helde his blody sworde in hand.” I always quote from the original poem, edit. 1555.

MALONE. his helm more hack'd than Hector's ;] So, in Chaucer's Troilus and Cresseide, Book III. 640: “ His helme to hewin was in twenty places,” &c.

STEEVENS. an eye to boot.] So, the quarto. The folio, with less force,-Give money to boot. Johnson.

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Pan. Well, well ?—Why, have you any discretion? have you any eyes? Do you know what a man is? Is not birth, beauty, good shape, discourse, manhood, learning, gentleness, virtue, youth, liberality, and such like, the spice and salt that season a man?

CREs. Ay, a minced man: and then to be baked with no date in the pye,—for then the man's date is out.

Pan. You are such a woman! one knows not at what ward

you

lie." CREs. Upon my back, to defend my belly; upon my wit, to defend my wiles;& upon my secrecy, to defend mine honesty ; my mask, to defend my beauty; and you, to defend all these : and at all these wards I lie, at a thousand watches.

Pan. Say one of your watches.

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- your date is

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no date in the pye,] To account for the introduction of this quibble, it should be remembered that dates were an ingredient in ancient pastry of almost every kind. So, in Romeo and Juliet :

“ They call for dates and quinces in the pastry.” Again, in All's well that ends well, Act I: “ better in your pye and porridge, than in your cheek.”

STEEVENS. at what ward you lie.] A metaphor from the art of defence. So, Falstaff, in King Henry IV.P.I: “ Thou know'st my old ward; here I lay;" &c. STEEVENS.

upon my wit, to defend my wiles ;] So read both the copies: and yet perhaps the author wrote:

Upon my wit to defend my will.
The terms wit and will were, in the language of that time, put
often in opposition. Johnson.
So, in The Rape of Lucrece :

What wit sets down, is blotted straight with will.Yet I think the old copy right. MALONE.

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CREs. Nay, I'll watch you for that; and that's one of the chiefest of them too : if I cannot ward what I would not have hit, I can watch you for telling how I took the blow; unless it swell past hiding, and then it is past watching.

PAN. You are such another!

Enter TROILUS' Boy..

: Boy. Sir, mylord would instantly speak with you.

PAN. Where?
Boy. At your own house; there he unarms him.”

Pan. Good boy, tell him I come: [Exit Boy.] I doubt, he be hurt.-Fare ye well, good niece.

CRES. Adieu, uncle.
PAN. I'll be with you, niece, by and by
CRES. To bring, uncle-
PAN. Ay, a token from Troilus.
CRES. By the same token-you are a bawd.

[Exit PANDARUS.
Words, vows, griefs, tears, and love's full sacrifice,
He offers in another's enterprize :
But more in Troilus thousand fold I see
Than in the glass of Pandar's praise may be ;
Yet hold I off. Women are angels, wooing :
Things won are done, joy's soul lies in the doing :'

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9 At your

own house ; there he unarms him.] These necessary words are added from the quarto edition. Pope. The words added are onlythere he unarms him. Johnson.

-joy's soul lies in the doing :) So read both the old editions, for which the later editions have poorly given:

The soul's joy lies in doing. Johnson. It is the reading of the second folio. Ritson. VOL, XV.

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Pan. Well, well ?- Why, have you any discretion? have you any eyes? Do you know what a man is ? Is not birth, beauty, good shape, discourse, manhood, learning, gentleness, virtue, youth, liberality, and such like, the spice and salt that season a man?

CRES. Ay, a minced man: and then to be baked with no date in the pye,—for then the man's date is out.

Pan. You are such a woman! one knows not at what ward

you

lie.? CREs. Upon my back, to defend my belly; upon my wit, to defend my wiles ;upon my secrecy, to defend mine honesty ; my mask, to defend my beauty; and you, to defend all these : and at all these wards I lie, at a thousand watches.

Pan. Say one of

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your watches.

6

-- your date is

7

no date in the pye,] To account for the introduction of this quibble, it should be remembered that dates were an ingredient in ancient pastry of almost every kind. So, in Romeo and Juliet :

“ They call for dates and quinces in the pastry." Again, in All's well that ends well, Act I: better in your pye and porridge, than in your cheek.”

STEEVENS. at what ward you lie.] A metaphor from the art of defence. So, Falstaff, in King Henry IV.P.I: “ Thou know'st my old ward ; here I lay ;" &c. STEEVENS.

upon my wit, to defend my wiles;] So read both the copies : and yet perhaps the author wrote:

Upon my wit to defend my will. .
The terms wit and will were, in the language of that time, put
often in opposition. Johnson.
So, in The Rape of Lucrece:

“ What wit sets down, is blotted straight with will." Yet I think the old copy right. MALONE.

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