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CITY-ROAD MAGAZINE.

OCTOBER, 1876.

MEMORIAL SKETCH OF SERGEANT ISAAC PYKE, OF

CATCOTT, BRIDGEWATER.

BY THE REV. JOHN WALTER.

a

(Concluded from page 390.) The great work of Sergeant Pyke at Catcott was his spiritual attention to the

young He writes : “When I came to this village there was neither Day nor Sunday School in it. I published for a Sunday-school, and on the second Sunday that I spent in the place we opened the school with one hundred and five scholars and eleven teachers, whose names I enrolled.” For twenty-nine years he pursued this work with unwearied activity. A whole generation of villagers was brought under the influence of Methodism through him. When his strength was failing, he had to meet with great opposition from the High Church party. In August, 1865, he writes :

“Miss said if she did not build a church and school at Burtle, Pyke would make all Burtle Methodists. She built a school there, and one at Catcott, which was placed under a Committee of High Church clergymen. The Rev. Dr. Blackwood and his curate were not allowed to enter the school, being Evangelicals. This led them to build another school, and the two together took away my children.” He asks those who censured him for giving up his Day-school, “ Could I stand against this ? Could I keep on a school without children ?” To the honour of the Rev. Dr. Blackwood and his curate it should be stated that when they knew they had taken away his children they procured him £10 a year from the Schoolmasters' Association.

The children who had been under his care he kept his eye on throughout life. Daily were they the subjects of his prayers. A few extracts from letters will show in what esteem he was held :

" Melbourne, October, 1858.—Dear Sir, I again thank you for the good instruction which you gave me.

I often look back to see the many happy days which I spent in your school. I shall never see you again in this world. May we meet in heaven! Your race is nearly ended. When you are gone there will be many raised up in Catcott and elsewhere as living monuments to the memory of one who did his best to lead wanderers in the right path. I trust that I am one.—Yours truly,

H. DURSTON."

Mrs. Durston writes "New Orphan House, Ashley Downs, October 10th, 1868.-My dear Mrs. Pyke, VOL. VI. FIRST SERIES.

:

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CITY-ROAD MAGAZINE.

OCTOBER, 1876.

MEMORIAL SKETCH OF SERGEANT ISAAC PYKE, OF

CATCOTT, BRIDGEWATER.

BY THE REV. JOHN WALTER,

the young

6 Miss

(Concluded from page 390.) The great work of Sergeant Pyke at Catcott was his spiritual attention to

He writes : “ When I came to this village there was neither Day nor Sunday School in it. I published for a Sunday-school, and on the second Sunday that I spent in the place we opened the school with one hundred and five scholars and eleven teachers, whose names I enrolled.” For twenty-nine years he pursued this work with unwearied activity. A whole generation of villagers was brought under the influence of Methodism through him. When his strength was failing, he had to meet with great opposition from the High Church party. In August, 1865, he writes :

said if she did not build a church and school at Burtle, Pyke would make all Burtle Methodists. She built a school there, and one at Catcott, which was placed under a Committee of High Church clergymen. The Rev. Dr. Blackwood and his curate were not allowed to enter the school, being Evangelicals. This led them to build another school, and the two together took away my children.” He asks those who censured him for giving up his Day-school, “Could I stand against this ? Could I keep on a school without children ?” To the honour of the Rev. Dr. Blackwood and his curate it should be stated that when they knew they had taken away his children they procured him £10 a year from the Schoolmasters' Association.

The children who had been under his care he kept his eye on throughout life. Daily were they the subjects of his prayers. A few extracts from letters will show in what esteem he was held :

"Melbourne, October, 1858.-Dear Sir, I again thank you for the good instruction which you gave me. I often look back to see the many happy days which I spent in your school. I shall never see you again in this world. May we meet in heaven! Your race is nearly ended. When you are gone there will be many raised up in Catcott and elsewhere as living monuments to the memory of one who did his best to lead wanderers in the right path. I trust that I am one.-Yours truly, H. DURSTON.”

Mrs. Durston writes : “New Orphan House, Ashley Downs, October 10th, 1868.-My dear Mrs. Pyke, VOL. VI. FIRST SERIES.

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