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1746: BEING THE FOURTH SESSION OF THIS ASSEMBLY. [Williamsburg:
William Parks.]

Caption title. 4 pp. 32x20.5 cm.
Reprinted: Hening, Statutes at Large ... of Virginia, V, 401-405.

State Law Library of Virginia. 1746. HOUSE OF BURGESSES. Journal. (Third Session.) [183]

THE / JOURNAL /OF THE / HOUSE OF BURGESSES. / AT A / GENERAL ASSEMBLY, / SUMMONED TO BE HELD AT THE Capitol, IN THE / CITY OF Williamsburg, ON Thursday THE SIXTH / DAY OF May, IN THE FIFTEENTH YEAR OF THE / REIGN OF OUR SOVEREIGN LORD GEORGE II. / BY THE GRACE OF GOD, OF Great-Britain, / France, AND Ireland, King, DEFENDER OF THE / Faith, &c. AND FROM THENCE CONTINUED, / BY SEVERAL PROROGATIONS, TO Thursday THE / TWENTIETH DAY OF February, IN THE NINE- / TEENTH YEAR OF HIS SAID MAJESTY'S REIGN; / AND IN THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1745 [1745-6). BEING / THE THIRD SESSION OF THIS ASSEMBLY. / WILLIAMSBURG: / PRINTED BY William Parks, M.DCC.XLVI. /

Title page. “To the Honourable William Gooch, Esq. ... The Humble Address of the Council", with his answer, [2] pp. Text, 82 pp.

35x22.5 cm. (20 February 1745 / 6-12 April 1746.) Pp. 47-50 missing. References: Evans, 2, No. 5873; An- Virginia State Library.

nual Report of the American Historical Association, 1897, p.

434. 1746. HOUSE OF BURGESSES. Journal. (Fourth Session.) [184]

JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF BURGESSES. JULY 11-JULY 16, 1746. 4TH. SESSION OF THIS ASSEMBLY. [Williamsburg: William Parks.] Fo. 8 PP. References: Annual Report of the No copies seen.

American Historical Association,

1897, p. 434; Evans, 2, No. 5874. (1747?] MERCER, JOHN (1704-1768.)

[185] TO THE WORSHIPFUL THE SPEAKER AND GENTLEMEN OF THE HOUSE OF BURGESSES THE CASE AND PETITION OF John Mercer, OF MarlboroughTown, IN THE COUNTY OF Stafford, GENT. [Petition for an act of Assembly confirming to him, the said Mercer, the land on which the town of Marlborough was established years ago, which town had since become extinct; the said Mercer having arranged with the Stafford county authorities for the land, with certain provisions and exceptions.)

Caption title. 3 pp. Verso of page 3 stamped, lengthwise the paper, "The Case and Petition of John Mercer, of Marlborough-Town, in the County of Stafford, Gent."

Virginia Historical Society. 1747. STITH, Reverend WILLIAM. (1689-1755.)

[186] THE / HISTORY / OF THE / FIRST DISCOVERY / AND / SETTLEMENT / OF / VIRGINIA: / BEING / AN ESSAY TOWARDS A GENERAL / HISTORY OF THIS COLONY. / BY WILLIAM STITII, A. M./ RECTOR OF Henrico PARISH, AND ONE OF THE GOVERNORS OF / William And Mary COLLEGE. / ... Williamsburg, / PRINTED BY WILLIAM Parks, M.DCC.XLVII.

Title page. Preface viii pp. Text, 331 pp. 19.8x12.5 cm. Second title:

AN / APPENDIX / TO THE / FIRST PART OF THE / HISTORY / OF / VIEGINIA: / CONTAINING / A COLLECTION OF SUCH ANCIENT CHARTERS / OB LETTERS PATENT, AS RELATE TO THAT PERIOD / OF TIME, AND ARE STILL EXTANT IN OUR PUBLICK / OFFICES IN THE CAPITOL, OR IN OTHER AUTHENTIC / PAPERS AND RECORDS. / Williamsburg: PRINTED BY W. Parks,/ M,DCC,XLVII. /

Title page. Preface, v. pp. Text, 34 pp. 19.8x12.5 cm. The Reverend William Stith, born in Virginia, 1689, was the son of Colonel John Stith, a prominent militia officer and local official of his day, and his wife Mary, daughter of the Honorable William Randolph I, of Turkey Island, Esquire, member of the House of Burgesses, of the governor's council and attorney-general of the colony.

William Stith was educated first in the grammar School of the college of William and Mary, subsequently matriculating at Queen's College, Oxford, May 21, 1724, receiving the degree of A. B., February 27, 1727-28, and A. M. in 1730. He was ordained a minister of the Established Church, and in 1731 was elected master of the grammar School of William and Mary College. He was also chaplain of the House of Burgesses. In June 1738, Mr. Stith was called, as rector, to Henrico Parish, Henrico county, and made his residence at Varina, the seat of justice, and it was here that he wrote his history of Virginia.

He was elected third president of William and Mary College, and qualified for that office August 14, 1752, but failed of appointment as commissary, which office his predecessors had held in connection with the presidency of that institution, owing, it is said, to a difference with Governor Dinwiddie. He continued to serve as president of the college until his death, and was also rector of York-Hampton Parish in York county.

The Reverend William Stith married his first cousin, Judith, daughter of Thomas Randolph, of Tuckahoe, (and Judith Fleming, his wife,) son of of the Honorable William Randolph I, of Turkey Island, Esquire, and died September 19, 1755, being succeeded by the Reverend Thomas Dawson, who had married his sister. (The National Cyclopedia of American Biography, vol. III, p. 232; Meade, Old Churches, Ministers and Families of Virginia, vol. I, pp. 137-138; Tyler, Williamsburg, the old Colonial Capital, pp. 143-144.)

There were two editions printed at Williamsburg in 1747, with the title pages reading alike but with the text printed from the same type readjusted. For convenience of description, but without any attempt to decide as to their priority, we shall designate them as (1) ... and (2). Edition (2) was printed on poorer paper than (1) and has sheets X of the text, and Cc, Dd, and sometimes Aa, of the Appendix badly discolored. Differences occur on almost every leaf ... (Cole, A Catalogue of books relating to ... America, vol. IV, 1677-1752, No. 963.)

There are two editions bearing the date of this year. The first edition may be known by the poor quality of the paper, and by pages 257 to 303 being misnumbered 247-293. This error was corrected in the second Williamsburg edition, which was not printed until about the year 1753, the date of the London edition. These two editions are identical, with no other change than the title pages, and were both, evidently, printed at Williamsburg. The copies met with are printed on different qualities of paper, the signature with the wrong paging differing materially in quality both in the

American editions and the supposed London edition. Henry Stevens noted as many as five varieties as being known to him ... (Evans, American Bibliography, vol. 2, 1730-1750, No. 6071.)

Those who may desire to make a further attempt at unravelling the bibliographical puzzle presented by the various copies of Stith's History are referred to the works given under "References.” The quotations above are from the two latest authorities.

This is, and is always likely to be, one of the standard books on early Virginia history. As planned by the author, it is the first volume of an extended work; but it is the only installment which ever appeared. It covers the history of Virginia under the London Company. The author had access to the archives of the colony, to the papers of Sir John Randolph, to the Byrd (of Westover) Library, to the Records of the London Company. He treats the writings of John Smith as reliable so far as they relate to events which occurred while he was in the country; considers Smith an honest man, but that his writings are very confused. The first part of Stith's volume is largely based on Smith, the latter part on the Records of the London Company. Defends the cause of the Company against the king. Written in dignified style, with thorough scholarship. Herbert L. Osgood, professor of American History in Columbia, in The Literature of American History, (edited by J. N. Larned) pp. 106.

Doctor Alexander Brown, in English Politics in Early Virginia History, pp. 124-132, treats the subject of Stith's sources at length, reaching the conclusion that Stith lacked a large quantity of the most important and necessary material, such as the pamphlets issued officially by the Virginia Company, or whose publication was encouraged by them; "the national official records in the premises, of Spain, France [and] the Netherlands,” and that he had but few of those of England. He therefore considers Stith to have been but poorly equipped for his undertaking, and, in addition, charges him with having overlooked political conditions which, he believes, largely controlled the affairs of Virginia, 1606-1624.

In 1753 what is known as the London Edition of Stith's History, was printed. (See No. 209.]

Reprinted: Sabin's Reprints, No. 6 ... New York . . 1865. 250 copies and 50 copies additional on large paper. (Alvord, printer.) References: Church IV. No. 963; Virginia State Library; Virginia His

Evans, 2. No. 6071; Winsor, III, torical Society; Library of Congress; 165; Brinley, No. 3796; Histori John Carter Brown Library; Americal Magazine. II, 184; North can Antiquarian Society; Lenox; American Review, October 1866, Boston Public Library; Boston p. 605; Brown, English Politics. Athenæum; New York Historical 124.132.

Society. 1747. HOUSE OF BURGESSES. Journal. (Fifth Session.)

(187) JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF BURGESSES. MARCIL 30 0 APRIL 18, 1747. 5TH SESSION OF THIS ASSEMBLY. (Williamsburg: William Parks.)

Fo. 19 PP.
References: Annual Report of the No copies seen.

American Historical Associa-
tion, 1897, p. 434; Evans, 2, No.

1748. DAVIES, Reverend SAMUEL (1723-1761.)

[188] The impartial Trial, impartially Tried, and convicted of Partiality:: IN / REMARKS / ON A MR. CALDWELL's, alias THORNTON'S / SERMON, / IxTITULED, / AN IMPARTIAL TRIAL OF THE SPIRIT, &c. / AND THE / PREFACE OF THE PUBLISHER IN Virginia. / To WHICH IS ADDED, / A SHORT APPENDIX, PROVING THE RIGHT OF THE SYNOD OF / New-York TO THE LIBERTIES ALLOWED TO PROTESTANT DISSENTERS, / BY THE ACT OF TOLERATION. / BY SAMUEL DAVIES, MINISTER OF THE Presbyterian ConGREGATION / IN Hanover, Vir. ginia. / ... WILLIAMSBURG: PRINTED BY W. PARKS, M.DCC.XLVIII. /

Title page. Text pp. 3-59; 20.3x15.3. The Reverend Samuel Davies was born near Summit Ridge, New Castle county, Delaware, November 3, 1723, of parents whose extraction was Welsh. His early education was given him by his mother and later he was under the tuition of Reverend Abel Morgan and the well known Reverend Samuel Blair, of Fagg's Manor, with whom he studied the classics and sciences, among the latter theology. Davies' health was no little impaired by his close application to study and through the remainder of his life he suffered from weakness thus induced. Mr. Davies was licensed to preach by the Newcastle Presbytery, June 30, 1746, and on February 19, 1747, was ordained an evangelist with a view to a mission in Virginia. In April following, he arrived in the colony and obtained, largely through the influence of William Gooch, then governor, license to minister to four congregations in Hanover county, in which ministry he remained until about the close of the summer when he returned to Delaware. It was feared that Mr. Davies might be a victim to consumption, but by the following spring his health was much improved and with the hope of recovery many calls were made to Presbytery for his services. He accepted the call of the Hanover congregations and returned to Virginia. Three new congregations were added to his ministry, giving him seven in all, three of which were in Hanover county, one each in Henrico, Goochland, Louisa and Caroline counties. These meeting places were widely separated and his parishioners were scattered over a big area. Mr. Davies became involved in a controversy with Peyton Randolph, attorney-general of the colony, and members of the General Court, as to how many places of preaching a dissenting minister should be allowed to have. Davies, contending that the Act of Toleration extended to the colonies, claimed that the colonial authorities had no power to limit his ministrations. His contention was sustained by the governor and a majority of the council, but Randolph was persistent in his argument, and the question remained debatable until several years later, when Davies went to England, and obtained an authoritative declaration to the effect that the Act of Toleration did extend to the colonies.

In 1753, Davies went abroad with the Reverend Gilbert Tennent at the request of the trustees, to solicit aid for the college of New Jersey (now Princeton University). The mission proved very successful. Davies returned to Virginia during the latter part of 1754 to find the colonists much wrought up over the aspect of conditions on the frontier. In the events which followed Davies played a prominent part. His militant gospel aroused many of his brethren to the imminent dangers of the situation, and many men went to the front with his call ringing in their ears. The first Virginia Presby. tery--known as the Hanover Presbytery--which was founded largely through

Davies' instrumentality-was authorized by the synod of New York, by act bearing date September 1755, and he was appointed to open the first meeting of the body, which was directed to assemble in Hanover on the third of December following. In the summer of 1758 Mr. Davies was elected president of the college of New Jersey; accepting this call, he entered upon his duties at Princeton in September 1759.

The Reverend Samuel Davies was twice married, first, in October 1746, to Sarah Kirkpatrick, who died September 15, 1747, without issue. He married, secondly, October 4, 1748, Jean, daughter of John Hclt, of Hanover county, Virginia, by whom he had six children.

Mr. Davies died at Princeton, February 4, 1761, in the thirty-seventh year of his age. Few men have achieved so indisputable a title to veneration and fame within so short a lifetime. As thinker, orator and man of action, Davies was apparently without a peer among the colonial clergy. Presbyterianism owes him profound gratitude for the vigor and sincerity with which he promulgated its doctrines and gained for them, largely by his compelling personality, a stronghold in Eastern Virginia. Lovers of religious liberty may look upon him as one of the strongest and most earnest seekers after the establishment of its blessed tenets.

A number of Mr. Davies' sermons were collected and published under the title: Sermons on the Most Useful and Important Subjects . . . London; J. Buckland. MDCCLXVI, 3 volumes. Of this collection many editions, both English and American, have been published. (Sabin, No. 18766.)

Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 1748. DAVIES, Reverend SAMUEL (1723-1761)

[189]
A / SERMON / ON MAN'S / PRIMITIVE STATE; / AND / THE FIRST /
COVENANT. / DELIVERED BEFORE THE REVEREND PRESBYTERY / OF New-Castle,
April 13TH 1748./ By SAMUEL DAVIES, Minister of the Gospel./...
Philadelphia:/ PRINTED BY WILLIAM BRADFORD, AT THE / SIGN OF THE
Bible, in Second-street. 1748. /

Title page. Text, pp. 3-42. 19x11.5 cm. Text, Ecclesiastes vii, 29. Reference: Evans, 2, No. 6121.

Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 1748. GOOCH, Sir WILLIAM, BARONET, Governor (1681-1751.) 1901

(VIGNETTE: ROYAL ARMS.) VIRGINIA SS. BY THE HONOURABLE SIR William Gooch, BART. His MAJESTY'S LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR, AND COMMANDER IN CHIEF, OF THE COLONY AND DOMINION OF Virginia, A PROCLAMATION. Proroguing the General ASSEMBLY. ... TWENTY-SIXTH DAY OF August, IN THE TWENTY SECOND YEAR OF His MAJESTY'S REIGN. [1748.) Broadside.

Virginia Historical Society. 1748. GENERAL ASSEMBLY. Laws in force.

[191]
ACTS OF ASSEMBLY, NOW IN FORCE, IN VIRGINIA. OCCASIONED BY
THE REPEAL OF SUNDRY ACTS MADE IN THE TWENTY SECOND YEAR OF HIS
MAJESTY'S REIGN, AND IN THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1748. (Williamsburg:
William Parks.)
Caption Title. 58 pp. 34.5x23.5 cm.

State Law Library of Virginia;

Lenox; Association of the Bar of
New York; Library of Congress.

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