Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

ON

SEVERAL SUBJECTS.

SERMONS ON PUBLIC OCCASIONS.

AND

A TRACT.

BY

WILLIAM PALEY, D. D.
f

LONDON :

PRINTED for THOMAs TEGG, CHEAPSIDE;

G. AND J. Robinson ; G. offor; AND J. Evans AND Co.: ALso,
R. GRIFFIN AND Co. GLASGow; AND J. CUMMING, DUBLIN.

1823.

- - - - - -

[ocr errors][graphic]
[ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors][merged small]

Sermon Page

1. Seriousness in Religion indispensable above all other

Dispositions...................................... ........... 1

2. Taste for Devotion ............................. ---------------- 19

3. The Love of God.............................................. 33

4. Meditating upon Religion....................... ------------- 43

5. Of the State after Death........ ----------------- ----------- ... 51.

6. On Purity of the Heart and Affections................... 60

7. Of the Doctrine of Conversion......... --------------- ... ... 68

8. Prayer in Imitation of Christ........ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - e. 83

9. On Filial Piety................................................. 90

10. Part1. To think less of our Virtues and more of our Sins 98

11. Part 2. To think less of our Virtues and more of our Sins 109

12. Salvation for Penitent Sinners.............................. 121

13. Sins of the Fathers upon the Children..................... 128

14. How Virtue produces Belief, and Vice Unbelief....... 136

15. John's Message to Jesus..................................... 145

16. On Insensibility to Offences................................. 152

17. Seriousness of Disposition necessary ...................... 160

18. The Efficacy of the Death of Christ....................... 168

19. All stand in Need of a Redeemer.......................... 175

20. The Efficacy of the Death of Christ consistent with the

Necessity of a good Life; the one being the Cause,

the other the Condition of Salvation.......... - - - - - - - - - - 183

21. Pure Religion......................... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ........ 194

22. The Agency of Jesus Christ since his Ascension....... , 202

273 2

Sermon Page

23. Part 1. Of Spiritual Influence in general................ 216

24. Part 2. Of Spiritual Influence in general.............. ... 224

25. Part 3. Of Spiritual Influence in general.............. ... 232

26. Part 1. Sin encountered by Spiritual Aid............... 243

27. Part 2. Evil Propensities encountered by the Aid of

the Spirit....... --------------------- ------------------------- 250

28. Part 3. The Aid of the Spirit to be sought and pre-

served by Prayer.......................................... 256

29. The Destruction of the Canaanites......................... 264

30. Neglect of Warnings .......... ------------------ - - - - - - - - - - - - - 273

31. The Terrors of the Lord...... -------------------------- ...... 280

32. Preservation and Recovery from Sin ...................... 290

33. This Life a State of Probation...................... -------- 302

34. The Knowledge of one another in a Future State....... 311

35. The General Resurrection................................ ... 318

SERMONS ON PUBLIC OCCASIONS.

1. Caution recommended in the Use and Application of

Scriptural Language.............. ------------------------ . 327

2. Advice addressed to the Young Clergy of the Diocess

of Carlisle................................................... 337

3. A Distinction of Orders in the Church defended upon

Principles of public Utility ................... .......... 351

4. The Use and Propriety of local and occasional Preaching 365

5. Dangers incidental to the Clerical Character stated..... 389

6. Preached at the Assizes of Durham....................... 405

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

1 PETER, iv. 7.
Be ye therefore sober, and watch unto prayer. .

THE first requisite in religion is seriousness. No impression can be made without it. An orderly life, so far as others are able to observe us, is now and then produced by prudential motives, or by dint of habit; but without seriousness there can be no religious principle at the bottom, no course of conduct flowing from religious motives; in a word, there can be no religion. This cannot exist without seriousness upon the subject. Perhaps a teacher of religion has more difficulty in producing seriousness amongst his hearers than in any other part of his office. Until he succeed in this, he loses his labour: and when once, from any cause whatever, a spirit of levity has taken hold of a mind, it is next to impossible to plant serious considerations in that mind. It is seldom to be done, except by some great shock or alarm, sufficient to make a radical B

« AnteriorContinuar »