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" Hath op'd his ponderous and marble jaws To cast thee up again. What may this mean, That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel Revisits thus the glimpses of the moon... "
Shakspeare's Hamlet - Página 26
por William Shakespeare - 1868 - 307 páginas
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Media Spectacles

Marjorie B. Garber, Jann Matlock, Rebecca Walkowitz, Rebecca L. Walkowitz - 1993 - 278 páginas
...name of the counsel, the hard-nosed senior senator from Pennsylvania, was "Specter": Arlen Specter. What may this mean, That thou, dead corse, again in...complete steel Revisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon? Uncannily, this same Arlen Specter was the aggressive and ambitious junior counsel for the Warren Commission,...
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Gothick Origins and Innovations

Allan Lloyd Smith, Victor Sage - 1994 - 234 páginas
...call thee Hamlet, King, father, royal Dane. O answer me. Let me not burst in ignorance, but tell Why thy canoniz'd bones, hearsed in death, Have burst...mean. That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel Revisits thus the glimpses of the moon. Making night hideous and we fools of nature So horridly to...
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Emerson's Literary Criticism

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1995 - 304 páginas
...the tragedian was that in which the tragedian had no part; simply Hamlet's question to the ghost:— "What may this mean, That thou, dead corse, again...complete steel Revisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon?" [Hamlet 1.4.51-53] That imagination which dilates the closet he writes in to the world's dimension,...
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Shakespeare at Work

John Jones - 2000 - 310 páginas
...gratuitously strange and not in any immediate way thematic. Hamlet asks his father's ghost Why thy canonized bones, hearsed in death, Have burst their cerements, why the sepulchre Wherein we saw thee quietly interr'd Hath oped his ponderous and marble jaws To cast thee up again. (i. 4. 28-32) The body hushed...
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Hamlet

William Shakespeare, Russell Jackson - 1996 - 208 páginas
...mind as his urgent thoughts continue in voice over. HAMLET V/O (continuing) but tell Why thy canonized bones, hearsed in death, Have burst their cerements, why the sepulchre Wherein we saw thee quietly enurned Hath oped his ponderous and marble jaws To cast thee up again. What may this mean, That thou,...
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John Barrymore, Shakespearean Actor

Michael A. Morrison - 1997 - 418 páginas
...prayer) royal Dane: O, answer me! (descending tone)/ . . . What may this mean (downward emphasis)/ That thou, dead corse, again, in complete steel,/...thus the glimpses of the moon,/ Making night hideous (quavering voice, but firmer; slight pause) . . . / Say, why is this? (slight pause; descending tone)...
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Romanticism, History, and the Possibilities of Genre: Re-forming Literature ...

Tilottama Rajan, Julia M. Wright - 1998 - 291 páginas
...call thee Hamlet, King, father, royal Dane. O answer me. Let me not burst in ignorance, but tell Why thy canoniz'd bones, hearsed in death, Have burst...mean, That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel Revisits thus the glimpses of the moon, Making night hideous and we fools of nature So horridly to...
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The First Quarto of Hamlet

William Shakespeare - 1999 - 144 páginas
...Have burst their ceremonies; why thy sepulchre, In which we saw thee quietly interred, 25 Hath burst his ponderous and marble jaws To cast thee up again....mean, That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel Revisits thus the glimpses of the moon, Making night hideous, and we fools of nature 30 So horridly...
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Symptoms of Culture

Marjorie B. Garber, William R Kenan Jr Professor of English and of Visual and Environmental Studies Marjorie Garber - 1998 - 273 páginas
...the tragedian was that in which the tragedian had no part; simply Hamlet's question to the ghost": What may this mean. That thou, dead corse, again in...complete steel Revisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon?13 It needs no ghost come from the grave to tell us that the "dead corse" here is Shakespeare,...
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Frederick Douglass: Oratory from Slavery

David B. Chesebrough - 1998 - 176 páginas
...death, Have burst their cerements; why the sepulcher, Wherein we saw thee quietly inurn'd, Hath opened his ponderous and marble jaws to cast thee up again. What may this mean, that thou, dead corpse, Again in complete steel, revisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon, Making night hideous, and...
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